Products

Westlake produce

Our
Products

No matter the time of year, Westlake Produce Company will be there for you, ready to supply a variety of high quality fruits and vegetables. We are a reliable source of apples & pears, melons, potatoes & onions, grapes & stonefruits, citrus, cherries & berries, tropicals & vegetables, latin items, specialties, and organics. Since we grow from multiple locations, we are able to provide the freshest fruits and vegetables year round.

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Apples & Pears

melons

Potatoes & Onions

Grapes & Stonefruits

Citrus

Cherries & Berries

Tropicals & Vegetables

Latin Items

Specialties

Organics

Apples & pears

Sales Staff

Andrew Bivens: 213-305-3704

Troy LeCheminant: 213-507-1088(Organics)

Jeff Sunahara: 213-507-9762

Manny Aguilar: 213-305-7626

Esmeralda Mejia: 213-505-0319

Varieties

Cosmic Crisp

Large, round, crisp and super juicy, these bi-color apples have a rich red that almost sparkles with starburst-like lenticels—which is where the name “Cosmic” comes from. The natural balance of acid and sugar in Cosmic Crisp® apples give them an unmatched sweetness, making them perfect for snacking, baking and entertaining.

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
USA-WA                 USA-WA USA-WA USA-WA
Autumn Glory

The Autumn Glory apple is on the large side, and tends toward an asymmetrical shape. It has yellow skin streaked with red striations. The Autumn Glory’s yellow flesh is firm, crisp/crunchy, coarse, and very juicy. It has a cider-like aroma, while the mostly sweet flavor is tastes like candy apple or baked apple pie, with caramel and cinnamon notes. Autumn Glory apples do not have much acidity. This apple resembles its parents in flavor, especially the Fuji.Autumn Glory apples are available in mid-fall through spring.

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
USA-WA USA-WA USA-WA USA-WA USA-WA           USA-WA USA-WA
Red Delicious

Red Delicious apples are available domestically year-round. This heart-shaped fruit comes in both blush and striped varieties. Red Delicious are mildly sweet making them great for snacks and salads.

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
USA-WA USA-WA USA-WA USA-WA USA-WA USA-WA USA-WA USA-WA USA-WA USA-WA USA-WA USA-WA

 

Granny Smith

These bright, green apples are crisp and juicy with a wonderfully tart taste. Granny Smith apples are available domestically year-round; warmer days and cool night ensure a fantastic crunch and great flavor. These apples are perfect for making apple pie or candy apples.

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
USA-WA USA-WA USA-WA USA-WA USA-WA USA-WA USA-WA USA-WA USA-WA USA-WA USA-WA USA-WA

 

Gala Apples

Shades of red and orange with a hint of yellow make this apple stand out amongst other varieties. In the past 15 years, Gala apples have significantly grown in popularity. Their mildly sweet taste makes the perfect snack or making apple crisp.

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
USA-WA USA-WA USA-WA USA-WA USA-WA USA-WA USA-WA USA-WA USA-WA USA-WA USA-WA USA-WA

 

 
Golden Delicious

Pale green to golden yellow and speckled with small lenticels. These apples are closely related to the red delicious but have a balanced sweet/ tart flavor. The firm crisp texture makes for excellent eating or used  in salads

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
USA-WA USA-WA USA-WA USA-WA USA-WA USA-WA USA-WA USA-WA USA-WA USA-WA USA-WA USA-WA

 

Fuji

The Fuji Apple was introduced to the United States from Japan in the 1980s and becomes more popular with every passing year. Fuji apples radiate a beautiful reddish-pink color, which is caused by the cool Washington climate. It is popular in baking because of its extremely sweet and juicy flavor.

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
USA-WA USA-WA USA-WA USA-WA WA, NZ,CH WA, NZ,CH WA, NZ,CH WA, NZ,CH USA-WA, CA USA-WA, CA USA-WA, CA USA-WA, CA

 

Jonagold

A stunning cast of crimson with a chartreuse hue underneath cover the unique sweet-sour flesh of the Jonagold Apple. Jonagolds develop as a large fruit with a thin skin. It is also a triploid meaning that it needs a second type of apple for pollination for it is not capable of self-pollination. The aromatic honey scent makes it a popular dessert apple.

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
USA-WA USA-WA USA-WA USA-WA WA, NZ,CH WA, NZ,CH WA, NZ,CH WA, NZ,CH USA-WA, CA USA-WA, CA USA-WA, CA USA-WA, CA

 

Pippen

The Newtown Pippin apple was cultivated by the American Colonies for export to Great Britain. It is a light green apple with striking hues of yellow and a slight russet around its stem. The tart flavor of the Newtown Pippin makes them an excellent choice for creating unique dishes.

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
USA-WA, OR USA-WA, OR USA-WA, OR USA-WA, OR USA-WA, OR USA-WA, OR USA-WA, OR USA-WA, OR USA-WA, OR USA-WA, OR USA-WA, OR USA-WA, OR

 

Jonathan

The Jonathan apple is generally medium to large in size with a crimson red color over a blushed yellow. The tough skin of the Jonathan apple protects its sinfully sweet flesh.

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
USA-WA USA-WA             USA-WA USA-WA USA-WA USA-WA

 

McIntosh

McIntosh apples are unique in look and taste with their glowing red and green skin, pearly white flesh, and tart flavor. The McIntosh apple is grown in New England and Eastern Canada and develops to a generally small to medium size. The McIntosh is a good choice for adding a unique tart taste to salads, pastries, smoothies, and more.

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
Wash – Can Wash – Can Wash – Can Wash – Can Wash – Can Wash – Can Wash – Can     Wash – Can Wash – Can Wash – Can

 

Rome

The Rome Apple is known for its round shape and thick, glossy skin. Rome Apples are used commonly in baking because the flavor grows richer as is it cooked. They offer a mild, sweet, tangy taste, with a slight floral aroma.

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
USA-WA, OR USA-WA, OR USA-WA, OR USA-WA, OR USA-WA, OR USA-WA, OR     USA-WA, OR USA-WA, OR USA-WA, OR USA-WA, OR

 

 
 
Braeburn

The Braeburn apple has a sweet-tart flavor and a color that can range from orange to red over a hue of yellow. Braeburns are harvested in Washington during September and early October. They are imported April through July from New Zealand and Chili.

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
USA-WA, OR USA-WA, OR USA-WA, OR USA-WA, OR USA, NZ, CH USA, NZ, CH USA, NZ, CH USA, NZ, CH USA-WA, OR USA-WA, OR USA-WA, OR USA-WA, OR

 

Honeycrisp

The widely popular Honeycrisp apples have red and pale green skin with frosted white flesh. They exude a fresh aroma and their flesh is sweet, giving every bite a delicious, candied crunch. Minnesota has made it its official state fruit since it is the most commonly grown apple there.

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
USA-WA               USA-WA USA-WA USA-WA USA-WA

 

Pink Lady

Also known as “Pink,” the Pink Lady’s irresistible tart bite and sweet flavor are its trademark characteristics. The apple produces a bright pink pigmentation and sweet taste due to the cool climates where it grows. The Pink Lady is slow to oxidize when cut, making it an excellent choice for cheese boards, sandwiches, and salads.

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
USA-WA, OR USA-WA, OR USA-WA, OR USA-WA, OR USA, NZ, CH USA, NZ, CH USA, NZ, CH USA, NZ, CH USA-WA, OR USA-WA, OR USA-WA, OR USA-WA, OR

 

Cameo

The white-spotted skin of the Cameo creates a distinct look that makes this apple one of a kind. This unique apple comes with a sweet taste and a great crispy crunch. Cameo apples store very well making them great for late-season availability.

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
USA-WA, OR USA-WA, OR USA-WA, OR USA-WA, OR USA-WA, OR USA-WA, OR USA-WA, OR   USA-WA, OR USA-WA, OR USA-WA, OR USA-WA, OR

 

Bartlett

The Bartlett Pear has a true pear shape. When people think of a pear they usually visualize the bartlett and its flavor. The bartlett is harvested while the skin is green and the skin of the fruit will turn yellow as the fruit ripens at room temperature.

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
USA-WA USA-WA ARG, CH ARG, CH ARG, CH ARG, CH USA-WA, OR USA-WA, OR USA-WA, OR USA-WA, OR USA-WA, OR USA-WA, OR

 

Red Bartlett

Just like the Green Bartlett changes color as it ripens, so does the Red Bartlett. The Red Bartlett starts as a dark red color with light vertical striping then changes to a bright red color as it ripens. The Red Bartlett when unripe is crisp and tart. After it matures it becomes sweet and juicy.

 

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
USA-WA, CA             USA-WA, CA USA-WA, CA USA-WA, CA USA-WA, CA USA-WA, CA

 

 
 
Anjou

Green D’Anjou pears are egg-shaped. They have a large round lower half that begins to taper off above the mid-point to a narrower rounded top. The skin of the D’Anjou pear is bright green and sometimes will have red blush. The skin color of the D’Anjou changes color varies slightly as it ripens.

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
USA-WA, OR USA-WA, OR USA-WA, OR USA-WA, OR USA-WA, OR USA-WA, OR USA-WA, OR   USA-WA, OR USA-WA, OR USA-WA, OR USA-WA, OR

 

 
 
Red Anjou

The shape of the Red D’Anjou pear is the same as the Green D’Anjou Pear. The color of the Red D’Anjou varies however, it is generally a dark maroon color with light vertical stripes created by the sun as the fruit hangs on the tree. Red D’Anjou Pears change slightly in color as they ripen.

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
USA-WA, OR USA-WA, OR USA-WA, OR USA-WA, OR USA-WA, OR USA-WA, OR USA-WA, OR   USA-WA, OR USA-WA, OR USA-WA, OR USA-WA, OR

 

 
 
Bosc

The Bosc pear has a characteristic curved stem and a long neck that gradually widens to a large round base. Bosc pears have a trademark brown russet color that covers the skin of the pear. This variety can range from full russet color to only slightly russeted, although the amount of russet does not affect the eating quality of the pear.

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
USA-WA, OR USA-WA, OR USA-WA, OR USA-WA, OR USA-WA, OR USA-WA, OR USA-WA, OR USA-WA, OR USA-WA, OR USA-WA, OR USA-WA, OR USA-WA, OR

 

 
 
Comice

The Comice pear is a has a very unique shape among the many pear varieties. The Comice is large and round at the base, with a very short neck at the stem end. The Comice pear has green skin and can sometimes have a red blush cheek on the pear. The Comice pear is well known for its smooth creamy sweet flavor.

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
USA-WA, OR USA-WA, OR USA-WA, OR USA-WA, OR USA-WA, OR USA-WA, OR   USA-WA, OR USA-WA, OR USA-WA, OR USA-WA, OR USA-WA, OR

 

 
 
Seckel

The Seckel pear is a very small pear and has a characteristic short, stubby, round shape with a small neck at the stem end. The Seckel pear has olive-green skin with a dark maroon blush which can sometimes cover the whole surface of the pear. The Seckelpear can be used as a decoration or even canned whole to be used as gifts.

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
USA-WA, OR USA-WA, OR USA-WA, OR           USA-WA, OR USA-WA, OR USA-WA, OR USA-WA, OR

 

 
 
Concorde

The Concorde pear has a unique shape among the other pear varieties. The Concorde pear is most recognized for its long skinny body that tapers off at the pointed neck at the stem end. The Concorde Pear will often have a golden russet color on the skin of the pear. The Concorde Pear does not have to be ripe to be sweet.

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
USA-WA, OR USA-WA, OR USA-WA, OR             USA-WA, OR USA-WA, OR USA-WA, OR

 

 
 
Forelle

The Forelle pear is one of the smallest of the pear varieties. The Forellepear has an asymmetrical shape with a small round body that tapers to a short stubby neck at the stem end. The trademark characteristic of the Forelle pear is its red lenticels.

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
USA-WA, OR USA-WA, OR USA-WA, OR   ARG, CH ARG, CH ARG, CH USA-WA, OR USA-WA, OR WA, CA, OR WA, CA, OR WA, CA, OR

 

 
 
Starkrimson

The Starkrimsonpear is one of the first varieties of pears to be harvested during the new crop season. Starkrimson pears have bright red skin and a thick stem. They have a very subtle sweetness.

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
                WA, CA, OR WA, CA, OR WA, CA, OR WA, CA, OR

 

 
 
French Butter

Brown like a Bosc, this anjou shaped pear is great for cooking. Sweet and smooth textured, this pear variety has a flavor all of its own. This variety’s season is very short, with limited production in September and October out of the Northwest.

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
                WA, CA, OR WA, CA, OR WA, CA, OR WA, CA, OR

 

 
 
Taylor Gold

The Taylorgold pear has the same basic shape as its parent the Comice pear. The Taylorgold pear is an offshoot of a Comice and was originally grown in New Zealand.

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
  NZ NZ NZ NZ NZ   NZ NZ NZ NZ NZ

 

 
Asian Pear

There are nine different varieties of Asian pears; Cho Juro, Hosui, Kikusui, Kosui, Shinko, Shinseiki, Tsu Li, 20th Century, and Ya Li. The two more common varieties are the Ya Li and the Hosui. The Ya Li has light yellow skin with a round body and a slight taper at the stem end. The Hosui is a brown skin pear with a round shape.

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
USA , CH USA , CH USA , CH USA , CH USA , CH USA , CH USA , CH USA , CH USA , CH USA , CH USA , CH USA , CH

 

 

 

 

Packaging

Apples

– 38/40#
– Tray packs
– 48, 56, 64, 72, 80, 88, 100, 113, 125, 138, 150, 163, 175, 198 carton
– Bags: 12/3#, 8/5# , 6/6#, 18/2#
– Clamshell: 9/8ct, 6/12ct
– 27# Euro Carton

Pears

– 40 /44# wrap packs
– 60, 70, 80, 90, 100, 110, 120, 135, 150 #
– Volume filled: 70, 80, 90, 100, 110, 120, 135, 150
– Bags: 12/3#, 8/5# , 6/6#, 18/2#
– Clamshell: 9/8ct, 6/12ct
– 27# Euro Carton

Storage & Tips

Apples

1. Store unwashed apples in the coldest part of your refrigerator

2. Apples are best stored 33 to 35 degrees with good humidity and some air circulation.

3. Don’t store apples with strong-smelling foods like onions and garlic. Apples can easily take on the odor of those foods.

4. Keep apples away from potatoes as they release gas as they age which causes apples to spoil.

5. To store an entire box of apples, consider a second refrigerator or keep the box in a cool, dark place. Wrapping each apple in paper will provide additional protection and delay ripening.

Pears

1. Pears ripen from the inside out so by the time they are soft on the outside, the inside flesh may be overripe and mealy.

2. Ripe pears should be stored in a refrigerator set at 35 to 45 degrees, leave unripe pears at room temperature in order to induce ripening.

3. To determine if a pear is ripe, check the neck of the pear daily. Apply gentle pressure with your thumb to the stem end of the fruit. Once it gives slightly to pressure, it is ripe and ready to eat.

Nutrition

Apple
Amount Per Serving: 1 medium (3″ dia) (182 g)
Calories 95
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 0.3 g 0%
Saturated fat 0.1 g 0%
Polyunsaturated fat 0.1 g
Monounsaturated fat 0 g
Cholesterol 0 mg 0%
Sodium 2 mg 0%
Potassium 195 mg 5%
Total Carbohydrate 25 g 8%
Dietary fiber 4.4 g 17%
Sugar 19 g
Protein 0.5 g 1%
Vitamin A 1% Vitamin C 14%
Calcium 1% Iron 1%
Vitamin D 0% Vitamin B-6 5%
Cobalamin 0% Magnesium 2%

 

Pear 

Serving Size 1 pear, medium (178 g)
Per Serving % Daily Value*
Calories 101
Calories from Fat 2
Total Fat 0.2g 0%
Saturated Fat 0g 0%
Polyunsaturated Fat 0g
Monounsaturated Fat 0g
Cholesterol 0mg 0%
Sodium 2mg 0%
Potassium 206mg 4%
Carbohydrates 27.3g 9%
Dietary Fiber 5.5g 22%
Sugars 17.3g
Protein 0.6g
 1% · Vitamin C 10%
Calcium 1% · Iron 2%
Vitamin A 1% Vitamin C 10%
Calcium 1% Iron 2%

melons

Sales Staff

Andrew Bivens: 213-305-3704

Brian Murai: 213-418-4451

Troy LeCheminant: 213-507-1088

Varieties

Cantaloupe

Cantaloupes have unique greenish netting on the skin and stunning, sunny, salmon-colored flesh. Cantaloupes are at their best during the warmer seasons. With a candy-like taste in every bite, the cantaloupe makes the perfect sweet summer snack.

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
Imported Imported Imported Imported CA-AZ CA-AZ CA-AZ CA-AZ CA-AZ CA-AZ CA-AZ CA-AZ

 

 
 
Honeydew

The Honeydew melon is a variety of muskmelon and is considered the sweetest of all melons. The skin of a good quality Honeydew melon will have a slightly waxy feel. The flesh will have a creamy yellow color that is rich with a sugary sweet flavor.

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
Imported Imported Imported Imported CA-AZ CA-AZ CA-AZ CA-AZ CA-AZ CA-AZ CA-AZ CA-AZ

 

 
 
Orange Flesh

This melon is a hybrid cross between a Cantaloupe and Honeydew. It has thin, smooth, yellow skin and irresistible, creamy, orange meat. The Orange Flesh is extremely juicy and sweet, making them the perfect refreshing summer fruit.

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
        CA CA CA CA CA CA    

 

 
Juan Canary

Canary melons vary in shape, similar to a Honeydew melon. The skin is a bright canary yellow with a smooth texture. This melon has a unique Cantaloupe-like flavor that is sweet with a modest tang.

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
      CA CA CA CA CA CA CA    

 

 
Galia

The Galia melon resembles a Cantaloupe on the outside and a Honeydew melon on the inside. It has creamy, light green flesh with a delightfully sweet flavor.

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
      CA CA CA CA CA CA      

 

 
Casaba

The Casaba melon was first cultivated in Persia thousands of years ago. It was not introduced to the United States until the late nineteenth century when it was imported from Kasaba, Turkey. The Casaba is a honey-gold color with green coloration on their wrinkled skin. Casabas are most often pumpkin-shaped with a slight point on the stem end. Casaba flesh is creamy and green with a delicately sweet, cucumber-like flavor.

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
        CA-AZ CA-AZ CA-AZ CA-AZ CA-AZ      

 

 
 
Golden Honeydew

The golden variety of Honeydew is rapidly gaining popularity throughout the United States. Golden Honeydews have a firm, gold shell and rich, dense flesh that is sweet and refreshing.

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
        CA CA CA CA        

 

 

Crenshaw

Crenshaw is a hybrid cross between the Casaba melon and the Persian melon. The Crenshaw has a butterscotch rind that is ridged and wrinkled. Its tender, salmon-colored flesh holds a sweet aroma and has an incredibly sweet accompanied with a slight kick.

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
        CA-AZ CA-AZ CA-AZ CA-AZ        

 

 
 
Persian

Persian melons are quite large with a dark, earthy green coloring that turns lighter as the melon ripens. The netting of the melon is very fine and will turn a slight brown when the melon is ripe.

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
        CA-AZ CA-AZ CA-AZ CA-AZ CA-AZ      

 

 
 
Santa Claus

Also known as the “Christmas melon,” Santa Claus melons are large with a freckled yellow and green rind. When the melon is ripe the rind will have a slightly waxy feel to it.

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
          CA-AZ CA-AZ CA-AZ CA-AZ CA-AZ    

 

Hami

Hami melons come from mainland China and have been popular amongst the Chinese for centuries. Hami melons have a distinct sweet and crispy flesh.

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
          CA-AZ CA-AZ CA-AZ CA-AZ CA-AZ CA-AZ  

 

 
 
Watermelon

Watermelons are oblong in shape and can weight anywhere from 15-25 pounds on average. Small and large, black and brown seeds are speckled within the sweet scarlet flesh of the watermelon. A healthy watermelon will have a dull rind with a dull yellow patch where the melon touched the ground. With a consistency that is 92% water and 8% sugar, watermelons are an excellent source of water. The red flesh of the watermelon comes from its high lycopene content, which helps in the prevention of cancers.

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
CA-MX CA-MX CA-MX CA-MX-FL CA-MX-FL CA-MX-FL-GA-NC-SC CA-MX-FL-GA-NC-SC CA-MX-IN CA-MX-IN CA-MX-IN CA-MX-IN CA-MX-IN

 

 
 
 
Seedless Watermelon

Seedless watermelons are actually a hybrid form of watermelon called a triploid, in which the seeds to not fully develop. The seedless watermelon holds the same sweet scarlet flesh of a Watermelon, with only empty, white “pips,” where the seeds would normally be found.

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
CA-MX CA-MX CA-MX CA-MX CA-MX CCA-MX CCA-MX CCA-MX CCA-MX CCA-MX CCA-MX CA-MX

Packaging

Cantaloupe

– 6ct, 9ct
– Jumbo: 9ct, 12ct, 15ct, 18ct, 23ct.

Honeydew

– 4ct, 5ct
– Jumbo: 5ct, 6ct, 8ct

Mixed Melons

– 3ct, 4ct, 5ct, 6ct, and 8ct.

Watermelon

– Carton: 3ct, 4ct,  5ct, 6ct.
– Bins: 35ct, 45ct, 50ct, 55ct, 60ct, 65ct.

Seedless Watermelon

– Carton: 3ct, 4ct, 5ct, 6ct, 8ct
– Bins: 35ct, 45ct, 50ct, 55ct, 60ct and 65ct.

Storage & Tips

Watermelon

1. Store whole watermelons at room temperature. Putting a whole watermelon in your fridge can actually reduce its nutritional value. If you’re not planning on cutting up your melon right away, it’s best to store the whole melon at room temperature, out of direct sunlight.

2. If you cut your watermelon in half and want to store one half, wrap it with plastic. The uncut watermelon should be tightly wrapped in plastic wrap. This will keep your watermelon from picking up the scents or flavors of other food in your refrigerator. Once it’s wrapped in plastic, you can store your watermelon in the fridge. You should still cut it up the rest of the way and use it or freeze it within 3 to 4 days.

3. Cut the watermelon and put the cubes in an airtight container. Even in an airtight container, your watermelon will lose its freshness and sweetness in 3 to 4 days.

4. Alternatively, freeze the cubed watermelon before putting them in an airtight box, put the box in the freezer and the watermelon can last up to six months.

Melons

1. Store melons at room temperature for up to 2 days to ripen them. If your melons aren’t ripe, you can keep them unrefrigerated for up to 2 days. Leave melons uncovered on a counter or tabletop. Alternatively, keep melons in a closed paper bag to accelerate the ripening process.

2. Buy or make perforated plastic bags to refrigerate melons. Melons need both moisture and cold to stay fresh. The best approach is to refrigerate melons in perforated bags to keep them moist without letting them dry out. Buy perforated plastic bags or make one by poking about 20 small holes in an ordinary bag with a pen or hole punch. Ripe melon can be stored in the fridge for up to a week.

3. Refrigerate cut melon in an airtight container for up to 3 days. Place cut melon pieces in a resealable, airtight plastic container. Keep it in the fridge for no more than 3 days before discarding it. Melon stored in the freezer can last up to 12 months.

Nutrition

Watermelon

Amount Per Serving: 1 NLEA serving (280 g)

Calories 85
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 0.4 g 0%
Saturated fat 0 g 0%
Polyunsaturated fat 0.1 g  
Monounsaturated fat 0.1 g  
Cholesterol 0 mg 0%
Sodium 3 mg 0%
Potassium 314 mg 8%
Total Carbohydrate 21 g 7%
Dietary fiber 1.1 g 4%
Sugar 17 g  
Protein 1.7 g 3%
Vitamin A 31% Vitamin C 37%
Calcium 2% Iron 3%
Vitamin D 0% Vitamin B-6 5%
Cobalamin 0% Magnesium 7%
Cantaloupe

Nutrition Facts

Cantaloupe

Serving size:
1 cup, cubed (160 g)

Calories 54
Calories from Fat 3

*Percent Daily Values (%DV) are based on a 2,000 calorie diet.

Amt per Serving

%DV*   Amt per Serving %DV*  
Total Fat 0g 0%   Total Carbohydrate14g 5%
Cholesterol0mg 0%   Dietary Fiber 1g 6%
Sodium26mg 1%   Sugars 13g  
Protein 1g        
Vitamin A 108%   Calcium 1%
Vitamin C 98%   Iron 2%
Honeydew

Amount Per Serving: 1 NLEA serving (134 g)

Calories 48
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 0.2 g 0%
Saturated fat 0.1 g 0%
Polyunsaturated fat 0.1 g  
Monounsaturated fat 0 g  
Cholesterol 0 mg 0%
Sodium 24 mg 1%
Potassium 306 mg 8%
Total Carbohydrate 12 g 4%
Dietary fiber 1.1 g 4%
Sugar 11 g  
Protein 0.7 g 1%
Vitamin A 1% Vitamin C 40%
Calcium 0% Iron 1%
Vitamin D 0% Vitamin B-6 5%
Cobalamin 0% Magnesium 3%

Potatoes & Onions

Sales Staff

Shawn Patrick: 213-305-4150

Joe Ciccarella: 213-305-3706

Arcy Salgado: 213-305-0546

Justine Torres: 213-305-3722

Michelle Michel: 213-305-3708

 

Varieties

Klondike Rose Potato:

The striking yellow flesh and rosy red skin of the Klondike Rose truly make this a one of a kind variety. The Klondike Rose has moist, creamy flesh which produces a rich, buttery flavor when cooked. The beautiful hue of the skin makes this potato perfect for adding unique color to your dishes.

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
ID-WA ID-WA ID-WA ID-WA ID-WA- AZ AZ AZ WA WA WA-ID WA-ID WA-ID

 

Red Potato :

The Red potato produces a thin skin colored in stunning shades of red. The flesh of the Red potato is moist and creamy when cooked, making them an excellent choice for mashed potatoes.

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
Wa Ca Wa Ca Fl Wa Ca Fl Wa Ca Az Fl Ca Az Ca Az Ca Az Ca Az Ca Az Ca Az Ca Az Ca Az

 

Russet Potato:

The Russet Potato is the most common potato in the United States. Russets have earthy brown skin and exquisite, hardy flesh. Mashed, roasted, or fried, Russets are the perfect versatile potato to have in your kitchen.

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
WA-ID-OR-CA WA-ID-OR-CA WA-ID-OR-CA WA-ID-OR-CA WA-ID-OR-CA WA-ID-OR-CA WA-ID-OR-CA WA-ID-OR-CA WA-ID-OR-CA WA-ID-OR-CA WA-ID-OR-CA WA-ID-OR-CA

 

White Rose Potato :

White Rose potatoes are a very unique variety of potato. The skin of the White Rose is so thin it almost seems transparent and it has dense and moist flesh.  When cooked, the flesh of the White Rose potato becomes velvety smooth with a delicious, rich flavor.

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
Wa Ca Wa Ca Wa Ca  Ca Ca Ca Ca Ca Wa Ca Wa Ca Wa Ca Wa Ca Wa

 

Yellow Yukon Gold :

The Yellow Yukon Gold has a unique flat, round shape and skin that radiates a lovely yellow color. The dense, buttery flesh of the Yellow Yukon Gold is perfect for mashed potatoes, hash browns, and more. The delectable, rich taste compliments well with savory dishes.

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
Ca Wa Ca Wa Ca Wa Ca Wa Ca Wa Ca Wa Ca Wa Ca Wa Ca Wa Ca Wa Ca Wa Ca Wa

 

Brown Onion :

Dark skinned hard onion

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
Wa Or Ca Wa Or Ca Wa Or Ca Wa Or Ca Wa Or Ca       Wa Or Ca Wa Or Ca Wa Or Ca Wa Or Ca

 

California Sweet Onion :

California Sweet onions are a buttery yellow and hold a subtle sweet flavor. California Sweets are large and crispy but do not have a sharp flavor like other onions. When cooked, the onion grows slightly sweeter, perfect for savory meals.

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
      Ca Ca Ca Ca Ca Ca Ca Ca  

 

Red Onions :

Red onions produce a beautiful shade of red. The stunning hue of the Red onion is perfect for adding some color and character to your meals. The meat of the onion is crisp and juicy and can be added to salads, grilled, cooked, or even eaten raw as a snack.

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
USA MX USA MX USA MX USA MX USA MX USA USA USA USA USA USA USA

 

Texas 1015 Sweet Onion :

The Texas 1015 Sweet Onion is a delicious and juicy onion with a crispy crunch in every bite. With its pungent, saccharine aroma it is hard not to resist. (remove)this sweet onion. The Texas 1015 is considered to be the sweetest of all onion varieties, making them an excellent choice for caramelizing or adding a unique sweet taste to any dish.

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
  MX Tx Tx Tx Tx Tx          

 

White Onion :

White onions have pearly white skin, crispy white flesh, and a distinct pungent aroma and non-abrasive aftertaste.

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
USA MX USA MX USA MX USA MX USA MX USA USA USA USA USA USA USA

 

Yellow Onion :

The dark-skinned hard onion is the most widely used cooking variety. The brown flaky skin surrounds a creamy white, almost translucent flesh. The brown onion has a crisp pungent flavor when raw, but a mild, nutty, and slightly sweet flavor when cooked.

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
USA MX USA MX USA MX USA MX USA MX USA MX USA USA USA USA USA USA

Packaging

Potatoes

– Bags: 3#, 5#, 10#, 15#, 20#
– Master bags.
– RPC-Bulk Sizes
– 50# Cartons Size
– A, B, C and Premium

Onions

– Bags: 2#, 3#, 5#, 10#, 15#, 20#,
– Master bags.
– Sacks: 3#, 5#, 10#, 25#, 50#
– Cartons: 40#, 50#

Storage & Tips

Potato

1. Store healthy potatoes in a dark, dry place. Once you’ve separated the damaged potatoes from the undamaged ones, put the latter in a spot that’s not exposed to light or moisture. These things can cause greening and/or rotting. 

2. Keep the temperature cool. Potatoes keep best at temperatures less than 50 degrees Fahrenheit. For maximum storage length, potatoes should remain between 35-40 degrees Fahrenheit.

Onion

1. The onions that harvest in the spring and summer are not hardy enough to store. They should be eaten within a few weeks of harvesting. Plan to store onions that are harvested in the fall, since these varieties are able to last through the winter.

2. Choose a cool, dark place to store your onions. The space should have a temperature maintained between 40 to 50° Fahrenheit. If the space is too warm, your onions will begin to sprout. If the location you chose is too cold, the onions will start to rot.

3. Keep the storage space dry. Onions easily absorb moisture, and the wetness in the air will rot your produce. The humidity level should be kept at 65 to 70 percent.

4. The following varieties of globe onions do well in long-term storage:

  • Yellow onions such as Ebenezer, yellow globe, downing yellow globe, and yellow globe Danvers.
  • White onions such as Southport white globes. These should only be stored if their necks are small.
  • Red onions including Wethersfield and Southport red globe.

Nutrition

Potatoes

Amount Per Serving: 1 Potato medium (2-1/4″ to 3-1/4″ dia) (213 g)

Calories 163
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 0.2 g 0%
Saturated fat 0.1 g 0%
Polyunsaturated fat 0.1 g  
Monounsaturated fat 0 g  
Cholesterol 0 mg 0%
Sodium 13 mg 0%
Potassium 897 mg 25%
Total Carbohydrate 37 g 12%
Dietary fiber 4.7 g 18%
Sugar 1.7 g  
Protein 4.3 g 8%
Vitamin A 0% Vitamin C 70%
Calcium 2% Iron 9%
Vitamin D 0% Vitamin B-6 30%
Cobalamin 0% Magnesium 12%

Onion

Amount Per Serving: 1 medium (2-1/2″ dia) (110 g)

Calories 44
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 0.1 g 0%
Saturated fat 0 g 0%
Polyunsaturated fat 0 g  
Monounsaturated fat 0 g  
Cholesterol 0 mg 0%
Sodium 4 mg 0%
Potassium 161 mg 4%
Total Carbohydrate 10 g 3%
Dietary fiber 1.9 g 7%
Sugar 4.7 g  
Protein 1.2 g 2%
Vitamin A 0% Vitamin C 13%
Calcium 2% Iron 1%
Vitamin D 0% Vitamin B-6 5%
Cobalamin 0% Magnesium 2%

grapes & stonefruits

Sales Staff

Manny Aguilar: 213-305-7626

Varieties

Green Seedless Grapes :

There are many varieties of green grapes including Sugraone, Princess, Thompson, and Perlettes. Green grapes are a beautiful light green shade with a sweet taste. They are an excellent source of vitamin C, vitamin A, calcium, and iron, making them a superb snack.

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
Import Import Import Import Mx/Coach Mx/Coach Cent. CA Cent. CA Cent. CA Cent. CA Cent. CA Cent. CA

 

Red Seedless Grapes :

The two most popular varieties of red grapes are Flame and Crimson. Red grapes are a striking deep wine color and have a sweet taste. Just like green grapes, they are a great source of nutrients.

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
Import Import Import Import Mx/Coach Mx/Coach Cent. CA Cent. CA Cent. CA Cent. CA Cent. CA Cent. CA

 

Black Grapes :

Black grapes are a deep shape of purple and are available in both seeded and seedless varieties. Black grapes are very sweet and have an excellent source of vitamin C, vitamin A, calcium, and iron.

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
Import Import Import Import Mx/Coach Mx/Coach Cent. CA Cent. CA Cent. CA Cent. CA Cent. CA Cent. CA

 

Globe Grapes :

Globe grapes have seeds, but also have a great eating quality. Globe Grapes are very sweet and have an excellent source of vitamin C, Vitamin A, Calcium and Iron.

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
Import Import Import Import Mx/Coach Mx/Coach Cent. CA Cent. CA Cent. CA Cent. CA Cent. CA Cent. CA

 

Yellow Peaches :

Yellow peaches are cultivated through warm temperate and subtropical regions of the world. The flesh of the peach, surrounding the pit, is a beautiful sunny yellow color. They are bright in flavor with a bit of acidity, that balances the sweetness as it ripens. Yellow peaches are mostly red with hues of yellow and orange beneath. Peaches are an excellent source of vitamin C making them an excellent snack.

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
Import Import Import N/A USA USA USA USA USA USA USA Import

 

White Peaches :

Just like yellow peaches, white peaches are cultivated throughout warm temperate and subtropical regions of the world. The flesh of the peach is white with an extremely sweet and juicy flavor. White peaches have a beautifully rosy pink skin with a light white background.

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
Import Import Import N/A USA USA USA USA USA USA USA Import

 

Yellow Nectarines :

Nectarines are quite similar to peaches, the main difference being that nectarines have smooth skin while peaches have slight fuzz to the skin. Yellow nectarines are painted in ravishing shades of red, yellow, and orange with sweet yellow flesh.

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
USA-WA USA-WA USA-WA USA-WA USA-WA USA-WA USA-WA USA-WA USA-WA USA-WA USA-WA USA-WA

 

White Nectarines :

White nectarines have a flavor that is sweeter than candy, and a rich creamy texture that is softer than the yellow varieties. White nectarines are considered sub-acid since it lacks the acidity of the yellow nectarine. They are best suited for eating fresh but can be used in a variety of ways.

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
Import Import Import N/A USA USA USA USA USA USA USA Import

 

Black Plums :

Plums are a hard-pitted fruit with varieties ranging in color from red to green. The deep purple color of the Black plum is the most common plum variety.  Plums produce a unique flesh that is juicy and carries a unique sweet-tart taste.

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
Import Import Import   USA USA USA USA USA USA    

 

Red Plums :

A deep red colored plum with a sweet and tart taste. Full of essential vitamins and nutrients that promote healthy vision and bone growth, while being a good choice for weight loss.

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
Import Import Import   USA USA USA USA USA USA    

 

Green Plums :

A unique, earthy green plum with a tart, astringent, and bitter taste. These small plums are best suited for pickling or fermenting.

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
Import Import Import   USA USA USA USA USA USA    

 

Plout/Plumcots :

These varieties are a result of natural cross-pollination between plum trees and apricot trees. Crossing these two “parents” results in a wide array of colors, sizes, and flavors. The Pluot is 70% plum and 30% apricot, the Plumcot is 50% plum and 50% apricot. Both fruits are much sweeter than plums and apricots because their sugar content is significantly higher than that of the standard varieties.

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
Import Import Import   USA USA USA USA USA USA    

 

Prune Plum :

Fresh prunes are usually referred to as Sugar Plums. They are used mainly in processing and sold as dried fruit which gives them a wrinkled texture and chewy bite. Fresh prunes are oval in shape. The Prune Plum is rich and sweet from
the sugar content.

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
USA-WA                 USA-WA USA-WA USA-WA

Packaging

White Nectarine

– 40/44 & LRGR, 48, 56, 64, 72, 84/88, 96

Yellow Nectarine

40#, 44#, LRGR, 48#, 56#, 64#, 72#, 84#, 88#, 96#

Apricot

– 64#, 56#, 72#, 80#, 88#, 96# 
– 3LYR 168
– 12#, 14#

Yellow Peach

– 36#, 40#, 44#, 48#, 56#, 64#, 72#, 84#, 88#, 96#

White Peach

– 36#, 40#, 44#, 48#, 56#, 64#, 72#, 84#, 88#

Red & Black Plum

– 20s, 30s, 40s, 50s, 60s, 70s, 80s, 90s

 

Storage & Tips

Grapes

1. Keep unwashed grapes in their original packaging. Grape packaging is designed with the right balance of ventilation and cover to keep grapes fresh for as long as possible. Try to avoid washing your grapes before you store them since the water will make your grapes mold more quickly; just store them as they came.

2. Put the unwashed bag of grapes in a high humidity drawer in your fridge. Grapes preserve the best if they are kept at 32 °F (0 °C) with 90-95% humidity. They will preserve the best in a high humidity drawer. If you don’t have a high humidity drawer, you can store the grapes in the back of the fridge, where it is typically cooler.

3. Freeze grapes to use in smoothies, wine, or as a cold snack. Frozen grapes make great wine ice cubes in the summer and can keep flavor for a few weeks in the freezer. Rinse your grapes under cold water, pat them dry, and remove the grapes from their stems. Then, lay the grapes out on a baking tray lined with wax paper, to prevent the grapes from clumping.

Peach

1. Place your peaches on the counter for a few days to help them ripen. You can place them in sunlight, but keep an eye on them every day to make sure they aren’t getting too hot, which in turn can make them mushy. Leave your unripe peaches on the counter for 2-3 days, or until they have a slight give when you grasp them.

2. Place a banana or an apple near your peaches to ripen them faster. Whether they’re on the counter or in a brown paper bag, you can simply place a piece of fruit, like a banana or an apple or even an avocado, near the peaches to help speed up the ripening process. This process takes 1-2 days.

3. Store your peaches on their shoulders (the side where the stem is). Whether you are putting your peaches into a bag, a bowl, or on the counter, place them stem-side down to limit the amount of contact they have with a hard surface.

4. Place whole, uncut peaches in the fridge on their own or in a plastic bag. If you’re going to be eating your peaches whole or using them soon for a recipe, you can simply place them in the fridge and store them in there for 2-3 days. If you’re putting them into a bag, make sure to not stuff too many into 1 container, to reduce the risk of bruising.

5. Store sliced peaches in an airtight container for 1-2 days. Use either a glass or plastic container with a lid or a plastic zip bag. If you use a bag, make sure to squeeze all the excess air out before you seal it. You can also freeze the sliced peach and put it in an airtight container, this will allow the peach last for 6-12 months.

Plum

1. Store ripe plums in the refrigerator. This will keep them in top shape and prevent fast deterioration. Place them in an open plastic bag – not a sealed one. Plums stored in the refrigerator will last two to four weeks.

2. Eat plums soon after picking or purchasing. Plums can be stored for several weeks, but they definitely taste best when they’re fresh. The sooner you can eat them after they ripen, the better.

3. Frozen plums will keep for several months, and up to a year. Choose plums that are at their peak flavor and ripeness – underripe plums won’t taste good when you thaw them. Freeze the plum the same way as you freeze the peach, it will last up to a year.

Nutrition

Grapes

Amount Per Serving: 1 cup (92 g)

Calories 62
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 0.3 g 0%
Saturated fat 0.1 g 0%
Polyunsaturated fat 0.1 g  
Monounsaturated fat 0 g  
Cholesterol 0 mg 0%
Sodium 2 mg 0%
Potassium 176 mg 5%
Total Carbohydrate 16 g 5%
Dietary fiber 0.8 g 3%
Sugar 15 g  
Protein 0.6 g 1%
Vitamin A 1% Vitamin C 6%
Calcium 1% Iron 1%
Vitamin D 0% Vitamin B-6 5%
Cobalamin 0% Magnesium

1%

 

Peach

Amount Per Serving: 1 medium (2-2/3″ dia) (150 g)

Calories 59
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 0.4 g 0%
Saturated fat 0 g 0%
Polyunsaturated fat 0.1 g  
Monounsaturated fat 0.1 g  
Cholesterol 0 mg 0%
Sodium 0 mg 0%
Potassium 285 mg 8%
Total Carbohydrate 14 g 4%
Dietary fiber 2.3 g 9%
Sugar 13 g  
Protein 1.4 g 2%
Vitamin A 9% Vitamin C 16%
Calcium 0% Iron 2%
Vitamin D 0% Vitamin B-6 0%
Cobalamin 0% Magnesium 3%

 

Plum

Serving Size 1 fruit 2 1/8″ diameter (66 g)
Per Serving % Daily Value*
Calories 30  
Calories from Fat 1.5  
Total Fat 0.2g 0%
Monounsaturated Fat 0.1g  
Potassium 104mg 3%
Carbohydrates 8g 3%
Dietary Fiber 0.9g 4%
Sugars 6.5g  
Protein 0.5g  
Vitamin A 4% · Vitamin C 10%
Calcium 0% · Iron 0%

Citrus

Sales Staff

Jeff Miller: 213-305-0548

Ron Miyamoto:213-304-5237

Juan Perez: 213-305-0837

Brian Murai: 213-418-4451

Bryce Murai: 213-305-7394

Varieties

Navels :

This easy peeling piece of fruit gets its name from the small navel formation on the blossom end. The California navel is virtually seedless with a refreshingly sweet taste.

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
USA USA USA USA USA USA Imported Imported Imported Imported USA USA

 

Valencia :

The Valencia orange is cultivated in other regions but the Florida’s climate produces the best piece of fruit.  The exterior of the Valencia orange is a sunshine color with some green hues on a thin, slightly pebbled texture. The flesh is bright orange, with a sweet and tangy juice that is perfect for juicing.

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
  USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA    

 

Cara Cara Navel Orange :

The Cara Cara navel orange is rich with Vitamin A and fiber. It has a sweet distinctive taste with dark pink flesh and a deep orange exterior.

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
USA USA USA USA       AUS AUS   USA USA

 

Bloods :

Blood oranges are a beautiful variety of citrus with an orange exterior that is easy to peel. The flesh of the orange is a haunting deep burgundy and virtually seedless.

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
USA USA USA USA               USA-WA

 

Satsuma :

The Satsuma mandarin is sometimes inconsistent in its shape but it peels very easily. The Satsuma has very few seeds and an excellent, rich flavor.

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
                    USA USA

 

Royal Mandarin :

The Royal Mandarin is a cross between a tangerine and an orange that offers a bold, rich flavor protected by a unique rosy exterior.

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
USA USA USA                  

 

Honey Mandarin :

The Honey Mandarin is a beautiful bright orange fruit with thin skin. The flesh is juicy and provides excellent flavor.

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
    USA USA                

 

Shasta Gold Mandarin

The Shasta gold mandarin is a larger piece of fruit with a rich sweet flavor and virtually no seeds. Its thin, coarse exterior is a deep orange and easy to peel.

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
      USA                

 

Golden Nugget Mandarin :

The Golden Nugget has a bumpy, easy-to-peel rind that produces a beautiful cast of gold. This seedless mandarin is considered by many to be one of the best tasting varieties.

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
      USA USA              

 

W.Murcott Mandarin :

One of the oldest varieties of mandarins. This variety has a thin exterior with an extremely juicy interior. The fruit is small but packs a lot of flavor in every segment.

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
USA USA USA USA     IMPORT IMPORT IMPORT   USA USA

 

Clementines Mandarins

A clementine is a tangor, a hybrid between a willow leaf mandarin orange and a sweet orange so named in 1902. The exterior is a deep orange color with a smooth, glossy appearance. Clementines can be separated into 7 to 14 segments. Similar to tangerines, they tend to be easy to peel. They are typically juicy and sweet, with less acid than oranges.

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
USA       USA USA USA       USA USA

 

Orri Mandarins

The Orri is a late-season mandarin with exceptional sweetness, but enough acidity to give a fine, well-balanced flavor. Orri is mostly seedless and is a wonderful variety to extend the season of easy-peelers once the main clementine varieties have finished. The skin is a lovely color, being thin and quite easy to remove.

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
USA-FL USA-FL USA USA, Imports: Israeli Imports: Israeli     Imports: Peruvian Imports: Peruvian      

 

Orlando Tangelos :

The Orlando has a lighter orange exterior and is fairly large in size. The flesh of the Orlando is tangy but holds a sweet finish. It is a cross between the Dancy tangerine and a Duncan grapefruit. This tangelo ranges in color from a deep orange to a light orange color.

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
USA                   USA USA

 

Minneola Tangelos :

The Minneola has a round shape with a prominent neck and a deep orange exterior. The Minneola has a bold, rich taste matching its distinctive, bright skin and is an excellent source of Vitamin C. The minneola tangelo has a hint of tartness from its grapefruit parentage.

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
USA USA USA USA     IMPORT IMPORT IMPORT     USA

 

Fairchild Tangerine :

The Fairchild variety is a cross between a Clementine mandarin and an Orlando Tangelo. The skin is thin with a deep orange color, it is somewhat pebbly, and does not peel as easily as other tangerines. This juicy citrus variety has a rich sweet flavor but does contain seeds.

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
USA-CA               USA-CA USA-CA USA-CA USA-CA

 

Honey Tangerine (FL) :

The Honey Tangerine has a smooth, yellowish-orange, rind that is easy to peel. The meat of the tangerine is a deep orange color and contains some seeds. It has a taste that is sweet like honey and rich in flavor.

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
  USA-FL USA-FL USA-FL       Imports: Peru Imports: Peru Imports: Peru    

 

Ojai Pixie

Pixies ripen in the spring from the previous year’s bloom. It takes 11 to 15 months for a blossom to grow into a ripe piece of fruit. Our little Ojai Pixies are therefore on the trees during California’s winter months and as they are small, they are quite susceptible to frost. The Ojai Pixie is pale orange in color with moderately juicy flesh.

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
    USA USA USA              

 

Hamlin Orange (FL) :

The Hamlin orange has a thin, pale orange rind. The flesh is also a pale orange color with a subtly sweet taste and contains some seeds, making it a great orange for juicing or fresh eating. It is one of the low acid varieties grown as well as being somewhat larger than other oranges.

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
                  USA-FL USA-FL USA-FL

 

FL White Grapefruit :

White grapefruit from Florida is juicier and tangier than other varieties. The rind is slightly thick with a smooth texture and a pale yellow color. The flesh is seedless and is perfect for snacking or juicing. The White grapefruit is a natural cross between a pummelo and a sweet orange.

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
USA-FL USA-FL USA-FL USA-FL USA-FL USA-FL     USA-FL USA-FL USA-FL USA-FL

 

CA White Grapefruit :

California grapefruit come in several varieties which vary depending on the time of year. The interior flesh ranges from the traditional Marsh white variety to the champagne blush of the Ruby, and the deep red tones of the Star Ruby. Its distinctively tart flavor and sweet aftertaste make a wonderful healthy treat.

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
USA-CA USA-CA USA-CA USA-CA USA-CA USA-CA USA-CA USA-CA USA-CA USA-CA USA-CA USA-CA

 

CA Red Grapefruit :

California grapefruit come in several varieties which vary throughout the year. The interior flesh ranges from the traditional Marsh white variety, to the champange blush of the Ruby and deep red tones of the Star Ruby. With its distinctively tart flavor, the grapefruit has a satisfyingly sweet aftertaste and packed full of beneficial nutrients

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
USA-CA USA-CA USA-CA USA-CA USA-CA USA-CA USA-CA USA-CA USA-CA USA-CA USA-CA USA-CA

 

FL Red Grapefruit :

The Florida Red grapefruit has a smooth yellowish-orange rind. The interior of the FL Red grapefruit is red in color and virtually seedless with a sweet flavor.

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
USA-FL USA-FL USA-FL USA-FL USA-FL         USA-FL USA-FL USA-FL

 

Star Grapefruit :

California grapefruit comes in several varieties which vary throughout the year. The interior flesh ranges from the traditional Marsh white variety to the champagne blush of the Ruby and deep red tones of the Star Ruby. With its distinctively tart flavor, the grapefruit has a satisfyingly sweet aftertaste and packed full of beneficial nutrients.

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
USA-CA USA-CA USA-CA USA-CA USA-CA USA-CA USA-CA USA-CA USA-CA USA-CA USA-CA USA-CA

 

Texas Grapefruit :

The Texas grapefruit is well known for being very sweet and juicy. The variety produced is the Rio Star, which is a combination of a Rio Red and a Star Ruby grapefruit. The skin overall has an orange blush color and beautiful deep red flesh.

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
USA USA USA USA USA         USA-FL USA-FL USA-FL

 

Pummelo

The largest of the citrus fruits, Pummelos are fairly round and may have a slight point on one end. Their skin is green to yellow and slightly bumpy, while the flesh ranges from pink to rose. They are sweeter than a grapefruit and are also called pomelo and Chinese grapefruit. Pummelos are available in the winter.

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
USA USA USA             USA USA USA

 

CA Lemons :

This highly acidic fruit is the most cold-sensitive of all the citrus and used for a variety of purposes. The skin color can range from pale yellow to bronze depending on the condition and maturity of the fruit. Lemons are most abundant during the spring and summer months, with the exception of the Meyer lemon which is produced mid-winter.

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
USA-CA USA-CA USA-CA USA-CA USA-CA USA-CA IMPORTED IMPORTED USA-CA/IMPORTED USA-CA/IMPORTED USA-CA/IMPORTED USA-CA/IMPORTED

 

Persian Limes :

Mexican Persian limes are a deep, earthy green color with slightly protruding ends. This seedless variety tends to have a longer shelf life than the key lime. They are excellent for juicing, adding flavor to sauces and salads, and much more.

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
Mexico Mexico Mexico Mexico Mexico Mexico Mexico Mexico Mexico Mexico Mexico Mexico

 

Autumn Honey Tangerines :

Honey tangerines are small citrus fruits with a flattened oval shape. They have thin, pale orange rinds with conspicuous oil glands which give its surface a pebbled texture. The volatile oils in the rind give off a flavorful aroma. The rind is loosely attached to the pale orange, juicy flesh. As their name implies, Honey tangerines are sweet with notes of honey and spice.

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
                  USA USA  

 

Juicy Crunch Tangerine :
Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
USA USA                   USA

Packaging

Navel Orange

– Standard Carton (approx. 40lbs)
– 4lbs, 5lbs, 8lbs & 10lbs bags
– 15kg carton (Chile imported)
– 16kg carton (Australia imported)

Valencia Orange

– Standard carton
– 4lbs, 5lbs, 8lbs & 10lbs bags

Cara Cara Orange

– Half carton (approx. 20lbs)
– Standard carton (approx. 40lbs)
– 3lbs bag
– 16kg carton (Australia imported)

Blood Orange

– Half carton (approx. 20lbs)
– 2lbs bag

Hamlin Orange

– Standard carton (approx. 38lbs)

Lemon

– Standard carton (approx. 38lbs)
– 2lb, 3lb bag
– 17kg carton (Chile imported)

Lime

– Standard carton (approx. 38lbs)

Grapefruits

– Standard carton
– 5lbs bag
– 24″ Tri-Wall Bins

Royal Mandarin

– Standard carton (approx. 38lbs)
– 10lbs carton
– 20lbs carton

Shasta Mandarin

– 22lbs volume filled carton

Satsumas Mandarin

– 22lbs carton
– 3lbs bags

Clementine Mandarins

– 2lbs bag
– 3lbs bag
– 22lbs carton

 

W. Murcotts Mandarin

– 2lbs bag
– 3lbs bag
– 22lbs carton
– 40lbs carton
– 10kg carton

Shasta Mandarin

– 22lbs volume filled carton

Satsumas Mandarin

– 22lbs carton
– 3lbs bags

Clementine Mandarins

– 2lbs bag
– 3lbs bag
– 22lbs carton

W. Murcotts Mandarin

– 2lbs bag
– 3lbs bag
– 22lbs carton
– 40lbs carton
– 10kg carton

Gold Nugget Mandarin

– Standard cartons
– 22lbs cartons

Orlando Tangelo

– Standard carton (approx. 36lbs)

Sunburst Tangerine

–  Standard carton (approx. 36lbs)
– 3lbs bags

Florida Honey Tangerine

– Standard carton (approx. 36lbs)
– 3lbs bag

Honey Tangerine

– 10kg carton (Peru Imported)

California Fairchild

– 22lbs volume filled carton

Ojai Pixie

– 22lbs volume filled carton

Minneola Tangelo

– Standard cartons (approx. 36lbs)
– 3lb bag
– 10kg carton (Peru & Australia imported)

 

Storage & Tips

Orange

1. Store them in the refrigerator. Oranges tend to preserve best at cooler temperatures and deteriorate quickly at warmer temperatures. Keeping them refrigerated will slow down the deterioration process and will help to maintain freshness for an extended period of time.

2. Keep them on the counter. Oranges kept on a kitchen counter or a table will remain fresh for up to one week at room temperature, depending on how fresh they were to begin with. If your room temperature tends to be on the warmer side, try keeping the home cooler, or placing the fruit bowl into the fridge at night.

Grapefruit

1. Store them on the counter. Grapefruit is best stored in a bowl on the counter if you intend to eat them within the first week. Due to its heaviness, the grapefruit does bruise easily, so be sure to stack them evenly.

2. Put them into your refrigerator’s vegetable bin. If you plan to keep your grapefruit for up to 3-4 weeks, be sure to store them in a low-humidity crisper drawer.

3. Freeze your grapefruit. Peel and freeze them whole, or in sections inside of Ziploc freezer bags or Tupperware. Frozen grapefruit will keep up to six months.

Lemon

1. Seal them in a Ziploc bag and refrigerate. This is considered the best method which preserves fresh lemons for up to four weeks and will also retain their juiciness during that time.

2. Keep them in the pantry. Lemons will remain fresh for approximately 5-7 days when left at room temperature. After that time, they will begin to lose moisture, dry out and harden.

3. Freeze them. Lemons can be cut into quarters, with all membranes and seeds removed. Place them into plastic bags and freeze. Use them within three months as the longer they are stored, the more bitter they become. 

Lime

1. Store at room temperature. Limes generally have a long shelf-life. Unlike oranges or lemons, fresh limes can last up to 2-3 weeks at room temperature.

2. Seal and refrigerate. Refrigerated limes can be placed into a loosely sealed Ziploc bag and will keep for up to 4 weeks.

3. Freeze your limes. Wash, peel and cut fruit into sections, removing membranes and seeds. Freezing whole limes may result in a mushy texture when thawed.

Other Tips

1. Freeze fresh citrus juice. Cut open fruit and squeeze the juice into ice cube trays to make popsicles or add to meals for additional flavoring.

2. Pickle your citrus fruits. Pickling is a great way to preserve and even enhance the taste of citrus fruit. Oranges, lemons and limes are often packed into an airtight jar and are pickled using salt and water.

3. Can your citrus fruits. Canning can preserve citrus fruits for up to nine months. A quart jar can hold the segments of about 3 large oranges or 4 lemons.

Nutrition

Oranges

Amount Per Serving: 1 fruit (2-5/8″ dia) (131 g)

Calories 62
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 0.2 g 0%
Saturated fat 0 g 0%
Polyunsaturated fat 0 g  
Monounsaturated fat 0 g  
Cholesterol 0 mg 0%
Sodium 0 mg 0%
Potassium 237 mg 6%
Total Carbohydrate 15 g 5%
Dietary fiber 3.1 g 12%
Sugar 12 g  
Protein 1.2 g 2%
Vitamin A 5% Vitamin C 116%
Calcium 5% Iron 0%
Vitamin D 0% Vitamin B-6 5%
Cobalamin 0% Magnesium 3%

 

Tangerines

Amount Per Serving: 1 medium (2-1/2″ dia) (88 g)

Calories 47
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 0.3 g 0%
Saturated fat 0 g 0%
Polyunsaturated fat 0.1 g  
Monounsaturated fat 0.1 g  
Cholesterol 0 mg 0%
Sodium 2 mg 0%
Potassium 146 mg 4%
Total Carbohydrate 12 g 4%
Dietary fiber 1.6 g 6%
Sugar 9 g  
Protein 0.7 g 1%
Vitamin A 11% Vitamin C 39%
Calcium 3% Iron 0%
Vitamin D 0% Vitamin B-6 5%
Cobalamin 0% Magnesium 2%

 

Grapefruits

Amount Per Serving: 1 NLEA serving (154 g)

Calories 65
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 0.2 g 0%
Saturated fat 0 g 0%
Polyunsaturated fat 0.1 g  
Monounsaturated fat 0 g  
Cholesterol 0 mg 0%
Sodium 0 mg 0%
Potassium 208 mg 5%
Total Carbohydrate 16 g 5%
Dietary fiber 2.5 g 10%
Sugar 11 g  
Protein 1.2 g 2%
Vitamin A 35% Vitamin C 80%
Calcium 3% Iron 0%
Vitamin D 0% Vitamin B-6 5%
Cobalamin 0% Magnesium 3%

 

Lemons

Amount Per Serving:1 fruit (2-1/8″ dia) (58 g)

Calories 17
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 0.2 g 0%
Saturated fat 0 g 0%
Polyunsaturated fat 0.1 g  
Monounsaturated fat 0 g  
Cholesterol 0 mg 0%
Sodium 1 mg 0%
Potassium 80 mg 2%
Total Carbohydrate 5 g 1%
Dietary fiber 1.6 g 6%
Sugar 1.5 g  
Protein 0.6 g 1%
Vitamin A 0% Vitamin C 51%
Calcium 1% Iron 1%
Vitamin D 0% Vitamin B-6 0%
Cobalamin 0% Magnesium 1%

 

Lime

Amount Per Serving: 1 fruit (2″ dia) (67 g)

Calories 20
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 0.1 g 0%
Saturated fat 0 g 0%
Polyunsaturated fat 0 g  
Monounsaturated fat 0 g  
Cholesterol 0 mg 0%
Sodium 1 mg 0%
Potassium 68 mg 1%
Total Carbohydrate 7 g 2%
Dietary fiber 1.9 g 7%
Sugar 1.1 g  
Protein 0.5 g 1%
Vitamin A 0% Vitamin C 32%
Calcium 2% Iron 2%
Vitamin D 0% Vitamin B-6 0%
Cobalamin 0% Magnesium 1%

Cherries & Berries

Sales Staff

Manny Aguilar: 213-305-7626

Andrew Bivens: 213-305-3704

Troy Le Cheminant: 213-507-1088 (Organics)

Jeff Sunahara: 213-507-9762

Esmeralda Mejia: 213-505-0319 (Berries)

Varieties

Dark Sweet Cherries :

All cherries are members of the family, Prunus, and are descendants of the wild cherry, Prunus avium. They are classified as stone fruits. Dark Sweet cherries are made up of many varieties; Brooks, Lapins, Bing, Sweet Heart, Tioga, Coral, Tulare, and Skeenas. Throughout these varieties, the color of dark sweet cherries ranges from a lighter red to a much deeper blood red. The flesh of the cherry is reddish-purple with a sugary, crisp bite.

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
Chile Chile Chile Chile CA CA/Pacific Northwest Pacific Northwest Pacific Northwest     Chile Chile

 

Rainier :

Rainier cherries distinguish themselves from all other cherry varieties by the color of their skin and their unparalleled high sugar levels. Their coloring exhibits layers of golden hues blushed with tones of pink and red, an unequivocally unique facade. Their shape is quintessential cherry: plump, rounded and slightly heart-shaped with a dimple at the stem end. The flesh is a pale golden color with red streaks near the skin and seed. The flavor of Rainier cherries is memorably sweet and low acid with a caramel-like finish on the palate.

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
Chile Chile Chile Chile CA CA/Pacific Northwest Pacific Northwest Pacific Northwest     Chile Chile

 

Strawberry

Strawberries have an overall conical heart shape and can vary in size depending upon cultivar and growing conditions. All varieties of strawberries have seeds on their exterior rather than their interior, which distinguishes them from a berry and a true fruit. They have a bright red sheen when fully ripe and a juicy yet firm texture. While sugar content can vary from sweet-tart to candy-like syrup, strawberries maintain a balanced acidity level.

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA

 

Blueberries :

Blueberries grow on low creeping shrubs or tall erect bushes, depending upon the variety. The small round berries can range in size from 5-16 millimeters in diameter. They first appear green but ripen into a deep shade of dusty blue. The soft, hazy white coating that develops on the skins’ surface, which is known as the bloom, is a natural waterproofing which helps protect the berries from the sun and other natural elements. Blueberries have a sweet and woodsy flavor with an acidity that can vary depending upon growing conditions. Long sunny days and warm temperatures develop a higher sugar content, while cooler temperatures and shorter days with limited sunlight increase acidity.

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
Chile Chile USA, CH USA, CH USA, CH USA, CH USA USA USA, Can Argentina Argentina Chile

 

Blackberry :

Blackberries are characterized by their coloring, their unique composition and their flavor. Like raspberries, Blackberries are not technically a berry, but rather an aggregate fruit of individual drupes held together by very fine, nearly invisible hairs. Blackberries do not have a hollow center, instead they have a solid, edible core. When ripe, Blackberries have a deep inky sheen with purple highlights. They are succulent, soft, and juicy. Their flavor is sweet, slightly tart, with earthy undertones.

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
MX MX MX MX MX-CA CA CA OR OR MX MX MX

 

Raspberry :

Raspberries are an aggregate fruit of individual drupelets that are held together by very fine, nearly invisible hairs. They have a hollow core and are conical with an overall rounded shape. The hollow core is created when the raspberry is separated from its growing receptacle. Their flavor can range from sweet-tart to low acid and jam-like depending on growing region and variety.

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
CA – MX CA – MX CA – MX CA – MX CA CA CA CA CA CA – MX CA – MX CA – MX
 

Packaging

Cherries

– 8/2# Bag (California)
– 12/1.33# Bag (California)
– 8/2# Clamshell (California & Northwest)
– 8/2.25# Bag (Northwest)
– 12/2.25# Bag (Northwest)

Storage & Tips

Cherries

1. Avoid sunshine. Unless you are going to dry them, your cherries should be placed in a dark, cool place. Cherries should at no point be placed in an area where they will be exposed to a large amount of sunlight. This exposure will shrink and wrinkle them which will sap their flavor.

2. Keep them cold. Cherries stay fresh in cold temperatures. Only keep your cherries at room temperature for a very short time. To keep your cherries fresh, you should refrigerate them. You just need to put the cherries in a resealable plastic bag and then place the bag in the refrigerator. They will stay fresh for 3–5 days, or even up to two weeks.

3. Freeze cherries. By freezing cherries, you will make sure that they keep their freshness and flavor. 

Strawberry

1. Do not wash the strawberries if you’re storing them in the fridge. Strawberries are like sponges that soak up every bit of moisture, and the more water they soak up, the more quickly they’ll spoil. If you wash the strawberries and then put them in the fridge, then they’ll spoil much more quickly no matter what methods you use.

2. Remove any moldy strawberries immediately. Mold spreads easily, so you should remove any moldy strawberries as soon as you buy them. If you store the fresh strawberries with the moldy ones, the mold will spread and they’ll spoil quickly.

3. Don’t store the strawberries in the plastic containers they came in. Though most store-bought strawberries are packaged in these containers, they aren’t ideal for storage. a plastic container is far more durable. The plastic containers won’t let in any air and will make the strawberries spoil faster.

4. Store strawberries in an open plastic container. To store strawberries in the container, simply remove them from their original container and place them in a large, open container. Line the container with paper towels to absorb any excess moisture from the strawberries. Don’t seal the container — let the strawberries air out instead of being trapped under a lid.

5. Remove the stems and freeze the strawberries, it can last up to 6 months. 

Blueberry

1. Store the blueberries in the refrigerator. Do not wash them if you don’t plan to eat them soon. Avoid keeping them in the coldest part of the fridge, or they will get damaged from the cold. The best place to store the berries is in the middle or bottom shelf. Try not to keep them in the crisper. Most crispers are too humid and do not provide enough circulation. This could lead to mold. When kept in the fridge, blueberries can last five to ten days.

2. Freeze the Blueberries on a tray before putting them in a bag to prevent them from sticking or clumping together.

Blackberry

1. If you purchase blackberries, keep them in their original container whether it’s a plastic clamshell or a cardboard berry box. They should be refrigerated and kept in the low humidity crisper drawer in your refrigerator.

2. Do not wash blackberries until you’re ready to use them. If you only need part of your berries, wash only the ones you need and keep the rest in the refrigerator. If you wash all the berries when you first bring them home, they will stay slightly damp, no matter how much you dry them. Moisture breeds mold so any water left on the berries will make them go bad more quickly.

Raspberry

1. Line the container with paper towels. Too much moisture can cause raspberries to become moldy. You should line the container you use with paper towels. This will absorb some moisture, keeping the raspberries fresh longer.

2. Do not place raspberries in the crisper. Raspberries will not stay fresher in a fruit or vegetable crisper. The air in the crisper may be slightly more humid than it is in the rest of the fridge. This can make your raspberries dry out quicker. It’s better to keep the raspberries outside the crisper when storing them in the fridge.

3. Do not freeze the berries when they are wet because they will stick together and can cause frost damage. Freeze them separately, then put them in a freezer-safe bag

Nutrition

Cherries

Amount Per Serving: 1 cup, without pits (155 g)

Calories 77
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 0.5 g 0%
Saturated fat 0.1 g 0%
Polyunsaturated fat 0.1 g  
Monounsaturated fat 0.1 g  
Cholesterol 0 mg 0%
Sodium 5 mg 0%
Potassium 268 mg 7%
Total Carbohydrate 19 g 6%
Dietary fiber 2.5 g 10%
Sugar 13 g  
Protein 1.6 g 3%
Vitamin A 39% Vitamin C 25%
Calcium 2% Iron 2%
Vitamin D 0% Vitamin B-6 5%
Cobalamin 0% Magnesium 3%

 

Strawberries

Amount Per Serving: 1 NLEA serving (147 g)

Calories 48
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 0.4 g 0%
Saturated fat 0 g 0%
Polyunsaturated fat 0.2 g  
Monounsaturated fat 0.1 g  
Cholesterol 0 mg 0%
Sodium 1 mg 0%
Potassium 225 mg 6%
Total Carbohydrate 11 g 3%
Dietary fiber 2.9 g 11%
Sugar 7 g  
Protein 1 g 2%
Vitamin A 0% Vitamin C 144%
Calcium 2% Iron 3%
Vitamin D 0% Vitamin B-6 5%
Cobalamin 0% Magnesium 4%

 

Blueberries

Amount Per Serving: 1 cup (148 g)

Calories 85
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 0.5 g 0%
Saturated fat 0 g 0%
Polyunsaturated fat 0.2 g  
Monounsaturated fat 0.1 g  
Cholesterol 0 mg 0%
Sodium 1 mg 0%
Potassium 114 mg 3%
Total Carbohydrate 21 g 7%
Dietary fiber 3.6 g 14%
Sugar 15 g  
Protein 1.1 g 2%
Vitamin A 1% Vitamin C 24%
Calcium 0% Iron 2%
Vitamin D 0% Vitamin B-6 5%
Cobalamin 0% Magnesium 2%

 

Blackberries

Amount Per Serving: 1 cup (144 g)

Calories 62
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 0.7 g 1%
Saturated fat 0 g 0%
Polyunsaturated fat 0.4 g  
Monounsaturated fat 0.1 g  
Cholesterol 0 mg 0%
Sodium 1 mg 0%
Potassium 233 mg 6%
Total Carbohydrate 14 g 4%
Dietary fiber 8 g 32%
Sugar 7 g  
Protein 2 g 4%
Vitamin A 6% Vitamin C 50%
Calcium 4% Iron 4%
Vitamin D 0% Vitamin B-6 0%
Cobalamin 0% Magnesium 7%

 

Raspberries

Amount Per Serving: 1 cup (123 g)

Calories 65
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 0.8 g 1%
Saturated fat 0 g 0%
Polyunsaturated fat 0.5 g  
Monounsaturated fat 0.1 g  
Cholesterol 0 mg 0%
Sodium 1 mg 0%
Potassium 186 mg 5%
Total Carbohydrate 15 g 5%
Dietary fiber 8 g 32%
Sugar 5 g  
Protein 1.5 g 3%
Vitamin A 0% Vitamin C 53%
Calcium 3% Iron 4%
Vitamin D 0% Vitamin B-6 5%
Cobalamin 0% Magnesium 6%

Tropicals & Vegetables

Sales Staff

Tropicals 

Jeff Miller: 213-305-0548

Juan Perez: 213-305-0837

Ron Miyamoto:213-304-5237

Esmeralda Mejia:213-505-0319

Vegetables

Shawn Patrick: 213-305-4150 (Leafy Greens)

Troy Le Cheminant:213-507-1088 (Hot House Bell Peppers)

Joe Ciccarella: 213-305-3706

 

Varieties

Red Mango :

Mangoes are grown throughout the world and come in many different varieties. The skin is usually green based with blushed color compliments. Its flesh is a striking yellowish-orange and contains a large pit in the center. When fully ripe, mangoes can range from mild to extremely sweet in taste.

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
  MX-Peru MX/Guat/Per MX/Guat/Per MX-GT MX-GT MX MX MX-BZ BZ-EC BZ-EC EC/PERU

 

Green Mango :

Raw mangoes picked when just mature, are also known as “Green mangoes.” Green mangoes can be slightly kidney-shaped or oval, depending on the variety. They have a sour and slightly bitter taste. Wearing gloves when cutting into a green mango is recommended, due to skin-irritating oils. Green mangoes are used in a variety of hot and cold dishes and can be used to tenderize meats.

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
Peru MX-Peru MX/Guat/Per MX/GT/Pe MX-GT MX-GT MX MX MX-BZ BZ-EC BZ-EC EC/PERU

 

Ataulfos :

Atauflos have a small, flattened oval shape with a very small seed. The flesh is thick and creamy with an extremely sweet taste and a vivid yellow color. Ataulflos are perfect for fruit salad, smoothies, and many other sweet creations.

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
Peru MX-Peru MX/Guat/Per MX/GT/Per MX-GT MX-GT MX MX MX-BZ BZ-EC BZ-EC EC/PERU

 

Kiwi :

The Kiwifruit has a fibrous, brown skin and a luminescent green or golden flesh. The Kiwifruit has a very unique sweet flavor, unlike any other fruit.

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
USA USA USA USA IMPORT IMPORT IMPORT IMPORT IMPORT USA USA USA

 

Yellow Squash :

Yellow squash can come as either crookneck or straight neck varieties. The flesh the yellow squash is creamy white and the exterior is a pale yellow. The two varieties differ slightly. The crookneck’s texture is slightly denser than that of straight necked yellow squash.

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
      USA-FL USA-FL USA-FL       USA-FL USA-FL USA-FL

 

Zucchini Squash :

With its color and shape, the Zucchini squash can very easily be confused with the cucumber, but do not be fooled, the Zucchini squash is much different. Zucchini squash can be cooked in many different ways in varieties of dishes. From Zucchini pasta to Zucchini fries, it is an essential vegetable in the kitchen.

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
      USA-FL USA-FL USA-FL       USA-FL USA-FL USA-FL

 

Green Beans :

Green beans average about four inches in size, they are long and thin with points at either end and produce a deep emerald green color. Within each thin pod, there are tiny, edible seeds.

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
        USA-FL USA – CA USA – CA USA – CA USA – CA USA – CA   USA-FL

 

Hot House Red Bell Peppers :

Hot House Bell peppers are crisp and sweet. Hot House Red Bell Peppers radiate a bold and bright red color of their thin, glossy skin. This particular variety tends to be much sweeter than other varieties, with less of an overbearing after bite. They are great for a wide range of recipes including stuffing, baking, or even eating raw as a snack!

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
SP, ISR SP, ISR SP,MX, SP,MX, MX, Hol MX, Hol MX, Hol `MX, Hol MX, Hol MX, Hol MX, Hol SP, ISR

 

Hot House Red Yellow Peppers :

Hot House Bell peppers are crisp and sweet. Hot House Red Yellow Bell Peppers have a smooth, glossy skin that is a burst of truly eye-catching sunshine yellow. This particular variety tends to be much sweeter than other varieties, with less of an overbearing after bite. They are great for a wide range of recipes including stuffing, baking, or even eating raw as a snack!

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
SP, ISR SP, ISR SP,MX, SP,MX, MX, Hol MX, Hol MX, Hol MX, Hol MX, Hol MX, Hol MX, Hol SP, ISR

 

Hot House Red Orange Peppers :

Hot House Bell peppers are crisp and sweet. Hot House Red Orange Bell Peppers are a vivid orange and have smooth, glossy skin. This particular variety tends to be much sweeter than other varieties, with less of an overbearing after bite. They are great for a wide range of recipes including stuffing, baking, or even eating raw as a snack.

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
SP, ISR SP, ISR SP,MX, SP,MX, MX, Hol MX, Hol MX, Hol MX, Hol MX, Hol MX, Hol MX, Hol SP, ISR

Packaging

Bell Peppers

– 11# Box
– 15# Box
– 25# Box
– 12/1# Pouch Bag

Storage & Tips

Mango

1. Store unripe mangoes in a dark, room temperature container. Room temperature storage helps unripe mangoes retain their flavor without spoiling too fast. Jars with airflow and plastic bags can protect your mangoes from pests without blocking out oxygen. Check on your mangoes every 2 days until they are ripe. Depending on when you bought your mangoes, they can take up to 8 days to ripen.

2. Store ripe mangoes in the fridge so they stay retain more of their flavor. Once mangoes are ripe, you can put them in colder storage like the fridge. Fresh mangoes in the fridge can last up to 6 days.

3. Watch out for signs that the mangoes have turned rotten. After six days, ripe mangoes are likely to show symptoms of rot like mushy, black skin and a sour smell. If the discoloration is inside the mangoes, throw them away.

Kiwi

1. Store kiwis on the counter to ripen them. Kiwi is one of those fruits that will continue to ripen after it’s harvested. When you buy unripe kiwi, leave them on the counter at room temperature, and they will ripen over the next three to seven days.

2. Transfer unripe kiwis to a paper bag to ripen them faster. Kiwi is a fruit that produces a gas called ethylene, which helps to ripen fruit at an accelerated pace. When you store kiwi in a paper bag, the bag traps the ethylene and ripens the fruit faster.

3. Eat ripe kiwis immediately. Kiwi is ripe when the fruit gives to gentle pressure when you press the fruit with your thumb. A ripe kiwi will also smell fragrant, and have darker brown skin. Eat the sweet and juicy fruit right away, or store it properly for extended shelf life.

4. Transfer kiwis to the refrigerator for longer storage. Once the Kiwis have finished ripening, place any leftovers into the refrigerator to preserve them. A ripe kiwi will only last on the counter for a couple of days but will keep in the refrigerator for one to two weeks.

5. Dehydrate them for longer shelf life. Dehydrated foods can last for years because all of the moisture gets removed. Kiwis are best dehydrated when they are ripe but still quite firm, as they will retain a better texture. To dehydrate kiwis.

6. Freeze ripe kiwi for extended periods. Rinse the kiwi under running water and scrub it with a brush or cloth. Pat the fruit dry. Remove the hardtop and bottom stems from the fruit. Slice the kiwi into bite-sized chunks and spread them out on a baking sheet. Place the baking sheet in the freezer overnight. Transfer the slices to an airtight container or freezer bag and return them to the freezer. Kiwi will last for up to nine months in the freezer.

Yellow Squash

1. Store summer squash by gently wiping the fruit clean with a damp cloth and then placing it in a perforated plastic bag (to maintain humidity) in the vegetable crisper of the refrigerator.

2. Do not store summer squash in the refrigerator for more than 4 days. Avoid storing summer squash at temperatures below 50°F (10°C); the fruit is susceptible to chilling injury at temperatures below 50°F; chilling injury symptoms include surface pitting, water loss, yellowing, and decay.

Zucchini

1. Keep the zucchini whole, dry, and unwashed. Cutting the zucchini will make it go bad much faster, so make sure it’s whole before refrigerating. Make sure not to wash the squash before storing as well, since the excess water will make it rot quickly. Pat the zucchini with a paper towel to remove moisture. If your zucchini has some condensation or moisture on its skin, make sure to gently pat it dry before storing it. Any excess moisture will cause mold and decay.

2. Place it in a plastic or paper bag with some ventilation. Keeping the zucchini enclosed in a bag will help slow the aging process. Make sure to provide some ventilation for proper air circulation. You can do this by using a perforated bag or by sealing the bag and poking some holes in it.

3. Put the bagged zucchini in a crisper drawer in the refrigerator. Zucchini rots when it comes in contact with too much moisture, so make sure to keep it in the crisper drawer rather than the main area of the refrigerator. This drawer maintains the ideal humidity level to keep vegetables fresh longer. Use the zucchini within 5-7 days. It’s best to use zucchini sooner than later because the longer you wait, the more it will secrete moisture and the skin will start to shrivel.

4. Check the zucchini for signs of rot before using it. If it feels soft to the touch and black spots start to show up on the skin, the zucchini is still edible. Cut out any black spots and use them quickly. However, if the zucchini feels mushy and starts to leak a thick, white liquid, it has gone bad. Throw it away and clean up any excess liquid.

Green Beans

1. Do not wash the beans. Washing the beans can leave moisture on them, which can cause them to mold. Use your hand to wipe off any dirt or debris on the beans, if any. Place a paper towel in a large resealable freezer bag. The paper towel will help to soak up moisture on the beans and prevent them from becoming moldy. Put the green beans in the bag. Make sure the green beans sit flat in the bag. Push as much air as you can out of the bag before you seal it. Refrigerate for up to 1 week. Keep the beans in the vegetable crisper drawer in your refrigerator so they stay fresh.

2. Wash the beans before using them in dishes. Before you toss the beans in a dish, take them out of the fridge and give them a rinse under cool running water. Make sure they appear hard and supple, not soggy or wet. Then, put them in casseroles, stir frys, and salads for a healthy crunch.

Bell Pepper

1.Store whole peppers without washing them. Any moisture on the pepper will make it rot faster in the fridge. Wait until you are ready to cook the pepper before you wash it.

2. Put peppers in a produce bag. Produce bags are made from mesh, which gives the peppers plenty of air. If you don’t have a produce bag, take a plastic grocery bag and poke a few holes in it.

3. Place bell peppers in the refrigerator’s vegetable drawer. The drawer will keep them fresh and crisp. Spread out the peppers as much as possible. If the drawer is tightly packed, they may not last as long.

4. Throw out bell peppers when they become too soft. Press lightly against the pepper’s skin with your fingertips. If the skin is firm and smooth, the pepper is still good. If it feels slightly spongy or wrinkled, you can cook the pepper, but don’t eat it raw. If the pepper is slimy or very soft, toss the pepper.

Nutrition

Mango

Amount Per Serving: 1 fruit without refuse (336 g)

Calories 201
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 1.3 g 2%
Saturated fat 0.3 g 1%
Polyunsaturated fat 0.2 g  
Monounsaturated fat 0.5 g  
Cholesterol 0 mg 0%
Sodium 3 mg 0%
Potassium 564 mg 16%
Total Carbohydrate 50 g 16%
Dietary fiber 5 g 20%
Sugar 46 g  
Protein 2.8 g 5%
Vitamin A 72% Vitamin C 203%
Calcium 3% Iron 2%
Vitamin D 0% Vitamin B-6 20%
Cobalamin 0% Magnesium 8%

 

Kiwi

Amount Per Serving: 1 fruit (2″ dia) (69 g)

Calories 42
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 0.4 g 0%
Saturated fat 0 g 0%
Polyunsaturated fat 0.2 g  
Monounsaturated fat 0 g  
Cholesterol 0 mg 0%
Sodium 2 mg 0%
Potassium 215 mg 6%
Total Carbohydrate 10 g 3%
Dietary fiber 2.1 g 8%
Sugar 6 g  
Protein 0.8 g 1%
Vitamin A 1% Vitamin C 106%
Calcium 2% Iron 1%
Vitamin D 0% Vitamin B-6 0%
Cobalamin 0% Magnesium 3%

 

Yellow Squash

Amount Per Serving: 1 medium (196 g)

Calories 32
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 0.4 g 0%
Saturated fat 0.1 g 0%
Polyunsaturated fat 0.2 g  
Monounsaturated fat 0 g  
Cholesterol 0 mg 0%
Sodium 4 mg 0%
Potassium 514 mg 14%
Total Carbohydrate 7 g 2%
Dietary fiber 2.2 g 8%
Sugar 4.3 g  
Protein 2.4 g 4%
Vitamin A 7% Vitamin C 55%
Calcium 2% Iron 3%
Vitamin D

 

Zucchini

Amount Per Serving: 1 medium (196 g)

Calories 33
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 0.6 g 0%
Saturated fat 0.2 g 1%
Polyunsaturated fat 0.2 g  
Monounsaturated fat 0 g  
Trans fat 0 g  
Cholesterol 0 mg 0%
Sodium 16 mg 0%
Potassium 512 mg 14%
Total Carbohydrate 6 g 2%
Dietary fiber 2 g 8%
Sugar 4.9 g  
Protein 2.4 g 4%
Vitamin A 7% Vitamin C 58%
Calcium 3% Iron 3%
Vitamin D 0% Vitamin B-6 15%
Cobalamin 0% Magnesium 8%

 

Green Beans

Amount Per Serving: 1 cup 1/2″ pieces (100 g)

Calories 31
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 0.1 g 0%
Saturated fat 0 g 0%
Polyunsaturated fat 0.1 g  
Monounsaturated fat 0 g  
Cholesterol 0 mg 0%
Sodium 6 mg 0%
Potassium 209 mg 5%
Total Carbohydrate 7 g 2%
Dietary fiber 3.4 g 13%
Protein 1.8 g 3%
Vitamin A 2% Vitamin C 27%
Calcium 3% Iron 5%
Vitamin D 0% Vitamin B-6 5%
Cobalamin 0% Magnesium 6%

 

 

Bell Pepper

Amount Per Serving: 1 pepper (45 g)

Calories 18
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 0.1 g 0%
Saturated fat 0 g 0%
Polyunsaturated fat 0 g  
Monounsaturated fat 0 g  
Cholesterol 0 mg 0%
Sodium 3 mg 0%
Potassium 153 mg 4%
Total Carbohydrate 4.3 g 1%
Dietary fiber 0.7 g 2%
Sugar 2.3 g  
Protein 0.9 g 1%
Vitamin A 10% Vitamin C 181%
Calcium 0% Iron 2%
Vitamin D 0% Vitamin B-6 5%
Cobalamin 0% Magnesium 2%

Latin Items

Sales Staff

Phil Lopez : 213-453-3166

Sonia Cortez: 562-587-3316

Varieties

Anaheim Pepper

Green Anaheim chile peppers are defined by their elongated curved lime green pod and their mild, sweet flavor. The chile’s skin is waxy, glossy and semi-thick. Inside the pod is a thin white seeded membrane. Raw Anaheim chiles are bright, succulent and slightly peppery in flavor. Green Anaheim chile peppers are available year-round with a peak season in mid-summer.

Availability: Year Round from Mexico

 

Jalapenos

Jalapeno pepper is a fruit of the Capsicum pod type. It is a medium-sized hot pepper when compared to other chili peppers, measuring an average of 2-3.5 inches in length but growing up to 6 inches long or longer.

Availability: Year Round from Mexico

 

Pasilla Pepper

Green Pasilla chiles are one of the most complexly flavored mild to medium heat chiles. The Green Pasilla is a mild to hot chile with a Scoville scale at 1,000 to 2,000 heat units. Green Pasilla chile peppers are available year-round.

Availability: Year Round from Mexico

 

Serrano Pepper

Serrano chile pepper pods are petite with an elongated shape coming to a rounded point at their tip end. Measuring on average one to two inches in length and just under an inch in diameter the Serrano pepper is fairly consistent in both size and shape. When immature its skin is smooth and glossy with a bright to dark green hue if allowed to mature fully it will turn a shade of scarlet red. Its flesh is thick and offers a hot pepper flavor and high acidity. It’s Scoville units range from 10,000 to 25,000.

Availability: Year Round from Mexico

 

Tomatillo

Tomatillos are small fruits (used as a vegetable) enclosed in a husk. The fruit resembles a small unripe tomato and is usually green or yellow. The yellow color indicates ripeness, but tomatillos are most often used when they are still green. Green tomatillos are firmer and easier to slice. The husk that holds the fruit is paper-like and is light brown. The flesh is slightly acidic with a hint of lemon. Tomatillos belong to the same family as tomatoes.

Availability: Year Round from Mexico

 

Yellow Caribe Pepper

Caribes are part of the ‘wax’ type of chile peppers which include several different varieties ranging from mild to scorching. This variety is hot (5,000 – 8,000 Scoville Units) and can be used as substitutes for Jalapeno to add a different color and flavor to salsas and recipes.

Availability: Year Round from Mexico

 

Red Fresno

Red Fresno chile peppers are petite but plump thumb-sized conically shaped chiles. Their skin, smooth, firm and waxy with a glossy sheen. Their flesh contains a cottony membrane which bears numerous creamy-white seeds. These seeds can be dried and used to grow future crops of the chiles. Fresno chile peppers are considered a hot chile, with flavor and heat similar to that of jalapeno or serrano chile. The Red Fresno is categorized as a hot pepper ranking between 2,500 to 8,000 units on the Scoville index.

Availability: Year Round from Mexico

 

Hungarian Pepper

The Hungarian Hot chile pepper is thin-skinned with a waxy exterior. Its yellow flesh turns from creamy yellow when immature to a bright red-orange when fully mature. It offers a sweet pepper flavor and heat that varies depending upon the variety and maturity of the pepper. Fully mature Hungarian Hot chiles when at the red stage will be at their hottest. At this point, the peppers are commonly dried and used to make decorative ristras or powdered seasoning. The Scoville range for Hungarian Hot peppers on average is 5,000 to 15,000.

Availability: Year Round from Mexico

 

Shishito Pepper

Shishito chile peppers have a bright, glossy green exterior skin. When allowed to ripen fully on the plant Shishitos will turn a vibrant red, and their walls will be thicker fleshed. A petite pepper measures on average two to three inches in length with a slightly curvy shape and tip end that folds up into itself. Its skin is lined with grooves and wrinkles, even more so than that of its look-alike the Padron pepper. It has a piquant and peppery flavor with sweet and vegetal nuances. Its heat can vary from very mild to spicy hot with one in ten peppers offering a heat, unlike the others, on average its Scoville units range between 100 and 1,000.

Availability: Year Round from Mexico

 

Habanero Pepper

Habanero Chile Peppers are considered to be the hottest edible Chile in the world. The Heat of the Habanero Chile pepper usually ranges between 100,000-350,000 Scoville units but some have been rated as high as 600,000 Scoville units. There are at least 18 varieties of Habanero Peppers and new types are being grown.

Availability: Year Round from Mexico

 

Chile Manzano

Manzana chile peppers can range from light green when immature to bright yellow, orange and red when ripe. Its heat level as well can vary from mild to hot depending upon specific variety and by maturity. While like many peppers the Manzana can be used when immature, it is most commonly utilized in its fully mature stage. Scoville units range between 10,000 and 30,000 on average.

Availability: Year Round from Mexico

 

Packaging

Fresh Peppers

– 10#, CTN

Thai Chili

– 30#

Storage & Tips

For all Chili Peppers

1. Drying Chillies: Rinse the chilies under cool running water, taking care to wash away dirt and other debris. Pick out bruised or damaged chilies, since these won’t keep for long periods of time. Pat the chilies dry with a paper towel before proceeding. Lay them out on a wire rack. You can use a cooling rack or another rack that has vents to allow airflow circulation from below. If possible, avoid using a solid cooking sheet or tray, since the lack of air flow will make it more difficult for the peppers to dry evenly. Try stringing and hanging the chilies. This is an easy and decorative way to dry them. Once the chilies are dry, you can keep them hanging up or store them for later use. Here’s how to do it: Thread a needle with a long piece of strong thread or fishing line. Pierce the chilies just under their caps to thread the needle through them. Do this until all of the chilies have been threaded. Hang them in a well ventilated and sunny place in your home. In three days to a week, they’ll be dry and ready to use

Oven dry the chilies. This is a good technique if you can’t wait days, and don’t want to wait for the chilies to dry out naturally. Instead of keeping the chilies whole, slicing them helps them dry evenly and quickly. Follow these simple steps: Slice the cleaned chilies in half lengthwise. Lay them seed-side up on a baking sheet. Bake at 125 degrees F (or your lowest setting) for several hours. This is still a lengthy process but quicker than air drying. You could also use a food dehydrator for quick results.

2. Pickling Chilies: Wash and slice the chilies. It’s not completely necessary You may quarter them or slice them lengthwise. If you prefer to preserve the chilies whole, use a knife to make a small slit in the side of each chile, which helps to preserve the shape. Depending on how hot you want your pickled chiles to be, you can remove the seeds or keep them. 

Pack the chilies in a sterilized jar. Choose a clean canning jar and fill it to within an inch of the rim with chiles. Make sure the jar has a tight-fitting lid. Plastic is preferable since it won’t rust in the refrigerator. If you want to flavor the chilies, mix in three tablespoons of salt and 15 peppercorns before packing the chilies. 

Heat white vinegar to a low boil. Use about two cups of vinegar, or enough to pour into the jar and cover the peppers completely. When the vinegar is hot, Pour the hot vinegar over the peppers. Fill the jar to within about half an inch of the top. Store in the refrigerator. The longer you let the mixture sit, the stronger the pickled taste will get. Enjoy the pickled peppers as a side dish or on sandwiches. The spicy vinegar makes an excellent salad dressing.

3. Preserving in Olive Oil: Wash and slice the chilies. To prepare chilies for preservation in oil, most people slice them into strips. However, smaller chilies may be left whole. Leave in as many seeds as you want depending on the heat level you desire. Lay them out on a baking sheet in a single layer. Broil the pepper pieces. Cooking the chilies before preserving them will help to bring out the best in their flavor. You can roast them over a grill or a gas burner. Pack the peppers in olive oil. Put the peppers in a clean jar or bottle. You may want to use a decorative olive oil container. Pour olive oil over the peppers until they’re entirely covered. Store the jar in a cool, dark place.

Nutrition

Anaheim Pepper

Amount Per Serving: 1 pepper (45 g)
Calories 18
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 0.2 g 0%
Saturated fat 0 g 0%
Polyunsaturated fat 0.1 g
Monounsaturated fat 0 g
Cholesterol 0 mg 0%
Sodium 4 mg 0%
Potassium 145 mg 4%
Total Carbohydrate 4 g 1%
Dietary fiber 0.7 g 2%
Sugar 2.4 g
Protein 0.8 g 1%
Vitamin A 8% Vitamin C 107%
Calcium 0% Iron 2%
Vitamin D 0% Vitamin B-6 10%
Cobalamin 0% Magnesium 2%

 

Jalapenos

Amount Per Serving: 1 pepper (14 g)
Calories 4
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 0.1 g 0%
Saturated fat 0 g 0%
Polyunsaturated fat 0 g
Monounsaturated fat 0 g
Trans fat 0 g
Cholesterol 0 mg 0%
Sodium 0 mg 0%
Potassium 35 mg 1%
Total Carbohydrate 0.9 g 0%
Dietary fiber 0.4 g 1%
Sugar 0.6 g
Protein 0.1 g 0%
Vitamin A 3% Vitamin C 27%
Calcium 0% Iron 0%
Vitamin D 0% Vitamin B-6 5%
Cobalamin 0% Magnesium 0%

 

Pasilla Pepper

Amount Per Serving: 1 pepper (7 g)
Calories 24
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 1.1 g 1%
Cholesterol 0 mg 0%
Sodium 6 mg 0%
Potassium 156 mg 4%
Total Carbohydrate 3.6 g 1%
Dietary fiber 1.9 g 7%
Protein 0.9 g 1%
Vitamin A 50% Vitamin C 0%
Calcium 0% Iron 3%
Vitamin D 0% Vitamin B-6 15%
Cobalamin 0% Magnesium 2%

 

Serrano Pepper

Amount Per Serving: 1 pepper (6.1 g)
Calories 2
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 0 g 0%
Saturated fat 0 g 0%
Polyunsaturated fat 0 g
Monounsaturated fat 0 g
Cholesterol 0 mg 0%
Sodium 1 mg 0%
Potassium 19 mg 0%
Total Carbohydrate 0.4 g 0%
Dietary fiber 0.2 g 0%
Sugar 0.2 g
Protein 0.1 g 0%
Vitamin A 1% Vitamin C 4%
Calcium 0% Iron 0%
Vitamin D 0% Vitamin B-6 0%
Cobalamin 0% Magnesium 0%

 

Tomatillos

Amount Per Serving: 1 medium (34 g)
Calories 11
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 0.3 g 0%
Saturated fat 0 g 0%
Polyunsaturated fat 0.1 g
Monounsaturated fat 0.1 g
Cholesterol 0 mg 0%
Sodium 0 mg 0%
Potassium 91 mg 2%
Total Carbohydrate 2 g 0%
Dietary fiber 0.6 g 2%
Sugar 1.3 g
Protein 0.3 g 0%
Vitamin A 0% Vitamin C 6%
Calcium 0% Iron 1%
Vitamin D 0% Vitamin B-6 0%
Cobalamin 0% Magnesium 1%

 

Yellow Caribe Pepper

Serving Size: 1 (1oz)
Amount Per Serving

Calories from Fat 1

Calories 11

% Daily Values*
Total Fat 0g 0%
Saturated Fat 0g 0%
Polyunsaturated Fat 0g
Monounsaturated Fat 0g
Trans Fat 0g
Cholesterol 0mg 0%
Sodium 3mg 0%
Potassium 287mg
Total Carbohydrate 2g 1%
Dietary Fiber 0g 0%
Sugars 1g
Protein 1g
Vitamin A 5% Vitamin C 67%
Calcium 0% Iron 2%

 

Red Fresno

For a Serving Size of 1 pepper(45g)
Calories 20 Calories from Fat 0(0%)
% Daily Value *
Total Fat 0g
Sodium 10mg 1%
Carbohydrates 3g
Net carbs 3g
Fiber 0g 0%
Glucose 2g
Protein 1g
Vitamins and minerals
Vitamin A 720μg 80%
Vitamin C 153mg 255%
Calcium 0mg 0%
Iron 0mg 0%

 

Hungarian Pepper

For a Serving Size of 1 pepper(27g)
Calories 7.8 Calories from Fat 1(12.7%)
% Daily Value *
Total Fat 0.1g
Saturated fat 0g
Monounsaturated fat 0g
Polyunsaturated fat 0.1g
Sodium 0.3mg 1%
Potassium 54.5mg
Carbohydrates 1.8g
Net carbs 1.5g
Sugar 1g
Fiber 0.3g 2%
Protein 0.2g
Vitamins and minerals
Vitamin A 11.1μg 2%
Vitamin A IU 220.3IU
Vitamin B6 0.1mg 11%
Vitamin B12 0μg 0%
Vitamin C 25.1mg 42%
Vitamin D 0μg 0%
Vitamin D IU 0IU
Vitamin E 0.1mg 1%
Vitamin K 2.7μg 3%
Caffeine 0mg
Calcium 3.2mg 1%
Iron 0.1mg 2%
Magnesium 4.3mg 2%
Phosphorus 7.8mg 1%
Zinc 0.1mg 1%
Copper 0mg 2%
Manganese 0.1mg 3%
Selenium 0.1μg 1%
Retinol 0μg
Lycopene 0μg
Thiamine 0mg 2%
Riboflavin 0mg 1%
Niacin 0.3mg 2%
Folate 14.3μg 4%
Choline 2.1mg 1%
Water 24.7g

 

Shishito Pepper

Serving Size: 100 g
Amount Per Serving

Calories from Fat 2

Calories 27

% Daily Values*
Total Fat 0.26g 0%
Saturated Fat 0.047g 0%
Polyunsaturated Fat 0.113g
Monounsaturated Fat 0.01g
Cholesterol 0mg 0%
Sodium 32mg 1%
Potassium 362mg
Total Carbohydrate 5.71g 2%
Dietary Fiber 1.8g 7%
Sugars 2.49g
Protein 1.92g
Vitamin A 77% Vitamin C 185%
Calcium 4% Iron 8%

 

Habanero Pepper

Serving Size: 100 g
Amount Per Serving

Calories from Fat 2

Calories 27

% Daily Values*
Total Fat 0.26g 0%
Saturated Fat 0.047g 0%
Polyunsaturated Fat 0.113g
Monounsaturated Fat 0.01g
Cholesterol 0mg 0%
Sodium 32mg 1%
Potassium 362mg
Total Carbohydrate 5.71g 2%
Dietary Fiber 1.8g 7%
Sugars 2.49g
Protein 1.92g
Vitamin A 77% Vitamin C 185%
Calcium 4% Iron 8%

Specialties

Sales Staff

Pill Lopez: 213 453-3166

Sonia Cortez: 562 587-3316

Esmeralda Mejia: 213-505-0319

Varieties

Yuca

The large tapered Yuca roots are similar in size and shape to a sweet potato and can be anywhere from one to several pounds in size and can grow up to 4 feet below the ground. The starchy flesh of the Yuca root is a light white or cream color with a grainy texture similar to potatoes. The meaty flesh is a mild, sweet flavor that has a somewhat nutty taste.
Availability: Year Round from Costa Rica

 

Taro

Taro is a perennial tropical plant grown for its swollen roots, or corms, and its leafy vegetation. The plant rarely flowers or seeds and relies on the roots for propagation, which may reflect how long the Taro plant has been cultivated by humans. Replanting the upper portion of the root with the stem bud can create a whole new plant.

Availability: Year Round from Costa Rica

 

Jicama

Jicama is an oval-shaped root vegetable, related to legumes. The size of this tuber can range from one to five pounds and some can reach up to fifty pounds. It has a rough brown skin and a juicy, crisp, white flesh. Jicama has a texture similar to an uncooked potato, yet crunchier and juicy. The taste is somewhat sweet, with a texture and taste similar to a water chestnut.

 

Spiny Chayote

Prickly chayote is small to medium in size, averaging 10-20 centimeters in length, and has a pear-like shape with deep linear indentations, folds, or puckers and many green-gold spines covering the surface. The number of spines will increase as the squash matures on the vine and the pale green rind is firm and is often discarded because of its tough nature. The creamy white flesh is crisp, and the central core contains one small, flat, edible, and light tan seed. Prickly chayote squash is crunchy and mild with a light, sweet flavor similar to a cucumber.

Availability: Year Round from Mexico

 

Chayote Squash

Chayote squash is small to medium in size, averaging 10-20 centimeters in length, and has a pear-like shape with deep linear indentations, folds, or puckers that run vertically along the fruit’s skin that meet at its flower end. The pale green rind is thin, smooth, firm, and edible but is often discarded because of its tough nature. The creamy white flesh is crisp to starchy and becomes succulent to cottony as it matures, and the central core contains one small, edible seed. Chayote squash is crunchy and very mild with a slightly sweet taste and light notes of cucumber.

Availability: Year Round from Mexico

 

Herb Epazote

Epazote is a unique culinary herb that cannot be replaced by any other herb. It is often referred to as having both an acquired aroma and taste. Its green jagged leaves emit aromas of petroleum and citrus while its flavor is pungent, lemony with a sharp finish that increases with age.

Available: Year Round from Mexico

 

Mexican Squash

Mild in flavor and varying in size from baby to medium to large, Mexican squash sports a pale green thin tender edible skin. Appearing nearly seedless, its tasty flesh is whiter and sweeter than zucchini. Shaped somewhat like zucchini, this variety is most often larger and more oblong.

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          Mexico Mexico Mexico Mexico Mexico    

 

Green Onion

Green onions are small to medium in size and grow in clusters of elongated, straight leaves and narrow, slender bases. The dark green leaves are smooth, stiff, and hollow with small, central tubes. Connecting into the leaves, the white base is dense, succulent, and firm with small white roots growing from the bottom of the base. Green onions are crisp and juicy with a grassy, sweet, and slightly pungent flavor that is milder than mature onions.

Availability: Year Round from Mexico

 

Guayaba (Guava)

The general classification of the Guava includes over 100 different species. Even what may be considered the common market Guava, which is better known as Apple guava (Psidium guava), is actually a family of dozens of different cultivars. These cultivars vary from the size of apricot to the size of an orange. Colorings vary from pale yellow to pink, yet Apple guavas maintain similar shapes, flavor profiles, and aromatics.

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USA USA USA     USA USA USA USA USA USA USA

 

Aloe Vera Leaf

Aloe is a succulent plant, botanically and commonly known as Aloe vera, with a scientific classification of Aloe barbadensis or Aloe barbadensis var. chinensis. Aloe has been consumed and applied topically for thousands of years and is well-known for its health benefits.

Availability: Year Round from Mexico

 

Fresh Garbanzo

One garbanzo seedpod contains two or three beans, or more accurately, peas. These beans are slightly sweet with a tender texture.

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      MX MX MX MX MX MX      

 

Papaya Maradol

Maradol papayas are large, elongated fruits with yellow skin often covered in green specks. The cylindrical fruits can weigh 3 to 5 pounds each and measure 30 to 35 centimeters long. The thin, leathery skin will become yellow and then orange when the fruits are fully ripe. The bright salmon-pink or red flesh is firm yet soft and has a musky scent. It is juicy and sweet, with a mild flavor. The small, round, shiny black seeds are edible and have a spicy, black pepper taste.

Available: Year Round from Mexico

 

Cactus Leaf

Cactus leaves are the pads or cladodes of the common edible cactus, ficus-indica. Harvested young for tenderness, the pads have sharp spines across its entirety that need to be handled carefully and removed before cooking and consumption. Large and mostly flat, the pads are usually only about half an inch thick and oval in shape. Nopales should be moderately bright green when fresh and fade to a muted olive green after cooking.

Availability: Year Round from Mexico

 

Brown Coconut

Brown coconuts are mature fruits from the coconut palm. The outer shell has a coarse brown hair-like texture. Inside the shell is a cavity filled with clear juice, known as coconut water, and a layer of firm white meat. The coconut water is slightly sweet, slightly salty, and is loaded with natural electrolytes. The meat is dense, rich and chewy.

Year Round from Mexico

 

White Coconut

The White coconut is pale cream to ivory in color with hairy white fibers. Round to oval-shaped, the fibrous husk is contained in a rind that encases a thick-shelled oval nut. Inside is a hollow kernel filled with a sweet milky liquid. While there are multiple varieties of coconuts that grow worldwide, inside is a hollow kernel filled with a sweet milky liquid. The meat of the white coconut is considerably more moist and fresh than the meat of the more mature brown husked coconut and often has a floral fragrance.

Availability: Year Round from Mexico

 

Colossal Garlic

Colossal garlic is large, beautiful, bright white garlic. This garlic is very pleasing to the eye as well as to the taste buds. Colossal garlic is very neat and clean with a thin, smooth skin protecting the delicious pungent cloves.

Availability: Year Round from California

 

Peeled Garlic

Peeled garlic makes it easier to prepare and cook. Crushing, chopping, pressing, or pureeing releases more of garlic’s essential oils and provides an intense, more pronounced flavor.

Availability: Year Round from China

 

Shallot

Shallots are small to medium in size, averaging five centimeters in length, depending on the specific variety, and are oblong with tapered ends. The bulbous bulbs are encased in a dry, papery, thin skin that flakes when touched and ranges in color from copper, gold, pale pink, to red. Inside the skin, there are clusters of cloves divided into individually wrapped segments similar to garlic. Small Shallot varieties average 2-3 cloves, and larger varieties typically contain 3-6 cloves. The firm, dense, and juicy cloves are off-white to translucent with light purple rings.

Availability: Year Round from China

 

Peeled Shallot

Availability: Year Round from China

 

Ginger

Ginger is a knobby, multiple “fingered” rhizome with light to dark tan skin with occasional rings. The thickness of the skin depends on whether the rhizome was picked early or when more mature. The flesh is firm yet fibrous. Ginger is aromatic, pungent and spicy. Gingerol is the primary compound that gives fresh ginger its spicy pungency when ginger is dried its flavor is intensified and when cooked, ginger is less pungent.

Availability: Year Round from China

 

Avocado

California and Mexican avocados are the best-tasting avocados in the world. Due to the growing climates and proximity to North America, they are the freshest and generally have much higher oil (which is the deliciousness we’ve grown to love) than other regions. Hass avocados have a pebbly skin that ripens from green to deep purple or nearly black, and they can vary in size from 5 to 12 ounces. Although the skin is thick, it is relatively easy to peel. The flesh closest to the skin is pale green, and as it nears the medium-sized central stone it develops a yellow undertone. The flesh is soft, creamy, and barely fibrous, with good oil content. The flavor is rich and nutty with a slightly sweet finish.

Availability: Year Round from Mexico

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Chile CA/Chile CA/Chile CA CA CA CA CA CA   Chile Chile

Packaging

Yuca

– 35#

Taro

– 35#

Jicama Medium

– 20# & #40

Jicama Jumbo

– CTN

Spiney & Regular Chayote

– 40#

Herb Epazote

– 12 CT

Mexican Squash

– FCY

Green Onion

– 24#

Guava

– CNT

Aloe Vera Leaf

– 20#

Garbanzo Fresh

– 15#

Papaya Maradol

– CTN

Brown & White Coconut

– 20 CT

Colossal White, Super Jumbo, X Jumbo, Jumbo

– 30#

Garlic Peeled

– 4/5#

Shallot

– 8/5#

Shallot Peeled

– 4/5#

Ginger

– 30#

Storage & Tips

Yuca Root

Store unpeeled in a cool, dark, dry place for up to 1 week. Peeled yucca root can be stored in water in the refrigerator – it will last for 1 month if you change the water every two days- or wrapped tightly and frozen for several months.

Taro Root

Store Taro Root as you would a potato. The leaves should be refrigerated and used within one week. To prepare, peel Taro Root with a vegetable peeler under running water to avoid any sensitivity to its sticky juices. Keep covered with water (in a bowl or pan) until ready to use.

Jicama

The ideal storage temperature is 55 to 59°F (12.5 to 15°C); at this temperature fresh jicama should keep for up to 4 months. However, some jicama purchased in stores may only last 1 to 2 weeks if inappropriately handled during distribution. If stored at lower temperatures, chilling injury causing decay, discoloration or loss of texture may occur. It is essential that the tubers remain dry; store unwrapped at cool room temperatures, or in the refrigerator, free from moisture, for 2 to 3 weeks. Once cut, cover tightly with plastic wrap, and store refrigerated for up to one week. Each pound of jicama yields about 3 cups chopped or shredded vegetables.

Chayote Squash

Choose chayote that is evenly colored, firm and blemish-free. Ideal storage temperatures are reported to be 50 to 60°F (10 to 15.5°C); below this, they are likely to show signs of chilling injury. To prevent drying out, place the chayote in a closed container or plastic bag in the refrigerator to maintain the humidity needed (ideally 90%) and store it for up to a month. Examine weekly for signs of undesired shriveling or brown spots.

Herb Epazote

Store fresh epazote either by placing the stems in a glass of water (like cut flowers), or wrap the leaves in a damp paper towel and place it into an unsealed plastic bag. You can freeze leaves of epazote in an ice cube tray filled with water. One frozen cube will give you the usual amount called for in most recipes.

Mexican Squash

Store summer squash by gently wiping the fruit clean with a damp cloth and then placing it in a perforated plastic bag (to maintain humidity) in the vegetable crisper of the refrigerator. Do not store summer squash in the refrigerator for more than 4 days. Avoid storing summer squash at temperatures below 50°F (10°C); the fruit is susceptible to chilling injury at temperatures below 50°F; chilling injury symptoms include surface pitting, water loss, yellowing, and decay.

Green Onion

Fill a glass or tall jar with 1–2 inches (2.5–5.1 cm) of water. Use a glass or jar that is heavy on the bottom so that it easily stays upright. The water should be cold or room temperature, but not warm. Put the root end of the onions in the water. Since green onions are typically sold with roots still attached, these roots can be used to help keep the onions fresh. By submerging the roots in water, you allow the onions to keep taking in water, which helps the onions stay firm and fresh. Cover the onions and the top of the container in a plastic bag. In order to keep the right level of humidity around your green onions in a refrigerator, you need to tent them with a plastic bag. This can be a produce bag or a zip-lock bag, whatever you have available. Cinch the plastic bag around the top of the container. If you have tented your green onions with a produce bag, then you can use a rubber band or string to cinch the plastic bag around the container. If you have used a zip-lock bag, you can simply close the zip-lock edge as much as possible toward the sides of the container. Put the glass in your refrigerator. Place the glass with the onions in it on a tall shelf of your refrigerator. Put it in a spot where it won’t get bumped a lot and where it will be stable so that it doesn’t fall over and spill water all over the fridge. Change the water every few days. To keep the onions fresh, you will need to refresh the water regularly. If you don’t, mold can accumulate on the surface of the water and can begin to decay the onions.

Guava

Leave the guava on the counter to ripen if they’re still firm. Your guavas should be soft to the touch and have a strong, heady scent before you refrigerate them. If the guavas aren’t ripe yet, let them sit on the counter for 2-3 days until the skin yields when you press on the fruit. Put the ripe guava in a plastic or paper bag. Before you refrigerate the guava, place the entire fruit in a bag to protect it in the refrigerator. Other fruits can give off gasses that encourage ripening, and the bag will ensure that the guava is safe. Place the bag in the crisper drawer of the refrigerator. Be sure to set the crisper drawer to a medium humidity to ensure that the guava doesn’t become too dry or too moist. Leave the bag open slightly at the top to let air circulate through the bag and the drawer. Use or eat the guava within 3-4 days of refrigerating. Refrigeration will slightly prolong the life of the guava, but be sure to use it in a timely manner. After 4 days in the refrigerator, the guava will be past ripe and should be thrown away. 

Aloe Leaves

Keep a whole aloe leaf in the fridge for 4-5 days. Wrap the leaf in plastic wrap, taking care to cover the cut end where it used to be connected to the rest of the plant. Once you’re ready to use the leaf, simply unwrap it from the plastic wrap and begin the process to extract the gel. Freeze aloe leaves for long-term storage. Simply take your aloe leaf, place it into a plastic freezer bag, and set it in the freezer. Your aloe leaf will have the best consistency and taste (if you’re going to eat it) if you use it within 6-8 months, though technically it will stay good for much longer than that.

Papaya

Ripe papayas should be refrigerated to slow down the ripening process. Papayas will ripen within a few days at room temperature, and even faster if you put them in a paper bag. Once ripe, this fruit will quickly turn to mush if not properly stored. Leave the skin on while the fruit ripens. Place ripe, whole fruit in a plastic bag in the refrigerator, and it should last about a week. To freeze, peel the papaya, slice lengthwise and scoop out the seeds. Cut into pieces and pack into rigid containers or heavy-duty plastic freezer bags. Cover with a 30 percent sugar solution (4 cups water to 2 cups sugar) and freeze up to 10 months.

Nutrition

Yuca

Amount Per Serving: 1 root (408 g)

Calories 650
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 1.1 g 1%
Saturated fat 0.3 g 1%
Polyunsaturated fat 0.2 g  
Monounsaturated fat 0.3 g  
Cholesterol 0 mg 0%
Sodium 57 mg 2%
Potassium 1106 mg 31%
Total Carbohydrate 155 g 51%
Dietary fiber 7 g 28%
Sugar 7 g  
Protein 6 g 12%
Vitamin A 1% Vitamin C 140%
Calcium 6% Iron 6%
Vitamin D 0% Vitamin B-6 20%
Cobalamin 0% Magnesium 21%

 

Taro

For a Serving Size of 0.5 cup sliced raw (52g)
Calories 60 Calories from Fat 0(0%)
  % Daily Value *
Total Fat 0g
Sodium 5mg 1%
Potassium 310mg
Carbohydrates 14g
Net carbs 12g
Fiber 2g 8%
Glucose 1g
Protein 1g  
Vitamins and minerals
Vitamin A 0μg 0%
Vitamin C 0mg 0%
Calcium 20mg 3%
Iron 0mg 0%

 

Jicama

Amount Per Serving: 1 medium (659 g)

Calories 250
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 0.6 g 0%
Saturated fat 0.1 g 0%
Polyunsaturated fat 0.3 g  
Monounsaturated fat 0 g  
Cholesterol 0 mg 0%
Sodium 26 mg 1%
Potassium 989 mg 28%
Total Carbohydrate 58 g 19%
Dietary fiber 32 g 128%
Sugar 12 g  
Protein 4.7 g 9%
Vitamin A 2% Vitamin C 221%
Calcium 7% Iron 22%
Vitamin D 0% Vitamin B-6 15%
Cobalamin 0% Magnesium 19%

 

Chayote

Amount Per Serving: 1 chayote (5-3/4″) (203 g)

Calories 39
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 0.3 g 0%
Saturated fat 0.1 g 0%
Polyunsaturated fat 0.1 g  
Monounsaturated fat 0 g  
Cholesterol 0 mg 0%
Sodium 4 mg 0%
Potassium 254 mg 7%
Total Carbohydrate 9 g 3%
Dietary fiber 3.5 g 14%
Sugar 3.4 g  
Protein 1.7 g 3%
Vitamin A 0% Vitamin C 26%
Calcium 3% Iron 3%
Vitamin D 0% Vitamin B-6 10%
Cobalamin 0% Magnesium 6%

 

Epazote

For a Serving Size of 1 sprig (2g)
Calories 0.6 Calories from Fat 0.1(14.6%)
  % Daily Value *
Total Fat 0g
Sodium 0.9mg 1%
Potassium 12.7mg
Carbohydrates 0.1g
Net carbs 0.1g
Fiber 0.1g 1%
Protein 0g  
Vitamins and minerals
Vitamin A 0.1μg 1%
Vitamin A IU 1.1IU
Vitamin B6 0mg 1%
Vitamin B12 0μg 0%
Vitamin C 0.1mg 1%
Vitamin D 0μg 0%
Vitamin D IU 0IU
Calcium 5.5mg 1%
Iron 0mg 1%
Magnesium 2.4mg 1%
Phosphorus 1.7mg 1%
Zinc 0mg 1%
Copper 0mg 1%
Manganese 0.1mg 4%
Selenium 0μg 1%
Retinol 0μg
Thiamine 0mg 1%
Riboflavin 0mg 1%
Niacin 0mg 1%
Folate 4.3μg 2%
Water 1.8g

 

Mexican Squash

Amount Per Serving: 1 medium (196 g)

Calories 33
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 0.6 g 0%
Saturated fat 0.2 g 1%
Polyunsaturated fat 0.2 g  
Monounsaturated fat 0 g  
Trans fat 0 g  
Cholesterol 0 mg 0%
Sodium 16 mg 0%
Potassium 512 mg 14%
Total Carbohydrate 6 g 2%
Dietary fiber 2 g 8%
Sugar 4.9 g  
Protein 2.4 g 4%
Vitamin A 7% Vitamin C 58%
Calcium 3% Iron 3%
Vitamin D 0% Vitamin B-6 15%
Cobalamin 0% Magnesium 8%

 

Green Onion

Amount Per Serving: 1 medium (4-1/8″ long) (15 g)

Calories 5
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 0 g 0%
Saturated fat 0 g 0%
Polyunsaturated fat 0 g  
Monounsaturated fat 0 g  
Cholesterol 0 mg 0%
Sodium 2 mg 0%
Potassium 41 mg 1%
Total Carbohydrate 1.1 g 0%
Dietary fiber 0.4 g 1%
Sugar 0.3 g  
Protein 0.3 g 0%
Vitamin A 3% Vitamin C 4%
Calcium 1% Iron 1%
Vitamin D 0% Vitamin B-6 0%
Cobalamin 0% Magnesium

0%

 

Guava

Amount Per Serving: 1 fruit, without refuse (55 g)

Calories 38
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 0.5 g 0%
Saturated fat 0.1 g 0%
Polyunsaturated fat 0.2 g  
Monounsaturated fat 0 g  
Cholesterol 0 mg 0%
Sodium 1 mg 0%
Potassium 229 mg 6%
Total Carbohydrate 8 g 2%
Dietary fiber 3 g 12%
Sugar 4.9 g  
Protein 1.4 g 2%
Vitamin A 6% Vitamin C 209%
Calcium 1% Iron 0%
Vitamin D 0% Vitamin B-6 5%
Cobalamin 0% Magnesium 3%

 

Garbanzo

Amount Per Serving: 1 cup (200 g)

Calories 729
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 12 g 18%
Saturated fat 1.3 g 6%
Polyunsaturated fat 5 g  
Monounsaturated fat 2.7 g  
Cholesterol 0 mg 0%
Sodium 48 mg 2%
Potassium 1750 mg 50%
Total Carbohydrate 121 g 40%
Dietary fiber 35 g 140%
Sugar 21 g  
Protein 39 g 78%
Vitamin A 2% Vitamin C 13%
Calcium 21% Iron 69%
Vitamin D 0% Vitamin B-6 55%
Cobalamin 0% Magnesium 57%

 

Papaya

Serving Size 1 cup, 1″ cubes (145 g)
Per Serving % Daily Value*
Calories 62  
Calories from Fat 4  
Total Fat 0.4g 1%
Saturated Fat 0.1g 0%
Polyunsaturated Fat 0.1g  
Monounsaturated Fat 0.1g  
Cholesterol 0mg 0%
Sodium 12mg 0%
Potassium 264mg 8%
Carbohydrates 15.7g 5%
Dietary Fiber 2.5g 10%
Sugars 11.3g  
Protein 0.7g  
Vitamin A 28% · Vitamin C 147%
Calcium 3% · Iron 2%

 

Coconut

Amount Per Serving: 1 medium (397 g)

Calories 1405
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 133 g 204%
Saturated fat 118 g 590%
Polyunsaturated fat 1.5 g  
Monounsaturated fat 6 g  
Cholesterol 0 mg 0%
Sodium 79 mg 3%
Potassium 1,413 mg 40%
Total Carbohydrate 60 g 20%
Dietary fiber 36 g 144%
Sugar 25 g  
Protein 13 g 26%
Vitamin A 0% Vitamin C 21%
Calcium 5% Iron 53%
Vitamin D 0% Vitamin B-6 10%
Cobalamin 0% Magnesium 31%

 

Garlic

Serving Size 1 average clove (4 g)
Per Serving % Daily Value*
Calories 4  
Calories from Fat 0  
Total Fat 0g 0%
Saturated Fat 0g 0%
Polyunsaturated Fat 0g  
Monounsaturated Fat 0g  
Cholesterol 0mg 0%
Sodium 1mg 0%
Potassium 12mg 0%
Carbohydrates 1g 1%
Dietary Fiber 0g 0%
Sugars 0g  
Protein 0g  
Vitamin A 0% · Vitamin C 1%
Calcium 1% · Iron 0%

 

Shallots

Amount Per Serving: 1 tbsp chopped (10 g)

Calories 7
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 0 g 0%
Saturated fat 0 g 0%
Polyunsaturated fat 0 g  
Monounsaturated fat 0 g  
Cholesterol 0 mg 0%
Sodium 1 mg 0%
Potassium 33 mg 0%
Total Carbohydrate 1.7 g 0%
Dietary fiber 0.3 g 1%
Sugar 0.8 g  
Protein 0.3 g 0%
Vitamin A 0% Vitamin C 1%
Calcium 0% Iron 0%
Vitamin D 0% Vitamin B-6 0%
Cobalamin 0% Magnesium 0%

 

Ginger

Amount Per Serving: 5 slices (1″ dia) (11 g)

Calories 9
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 0.1 g 0%
Saturated fat 0 g 0%
Polyunsaturated fat 0 g  
Monounsaturated fat 0 g  
Cholesterol 0 mg 0%
Sodium 1 mg 0%
Potassium 46 mg 1%
Total Carbohydrate 2 g 0%
Dietary fiber 0.2 g 0%
Sugar 0.2 g  
Protein 0.2 g 0%
Vitamin A 0% Vitamin C 1%
Calcium 0% Iron 0%
Vitamin D 0% Vitamin B-6 0%
Cobalamin 0% Magnesium 1%

 

Avocado

Amount Per Serving: 1 avocado, NS as to Florida or California (201 g)

Calories 322
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 29 g 44%
Saturated fat 4.3 g 21%
Polyunsaturated fat 3.7 g  
Monounsaturated fat 20 g  
Cholesterol 0 mg 0%
Sodium 14 mg 0%
Potassium 975 mg 27%
Total Carbohydrate 17 g 5%
Dietary fiber 13 g 52%
Sugar 1.3 g  
Protein 4 g 8%
Vitamin A 5% Vitamin C 33%
Calcium 2% Iron 6%
Vitamin D 0% Vitamin B-6 25%
Cobalamin 0% Magnesium 14%

Organics

Sales Staff

 

Troy Le Cheminant: 213-507-1088 

Esmeralda Mejia: 213-505-0319

Varieties

Broccoli

Broccoli grows like a tree with a thick, edible trunk that sprouts leaves, or branches and clusters of small, tight flower heads that turn bright green when cooked. Once fully mature or bolting, the flower buds will sprout golden yellow edible flowers. Broccoli grows in two common forms: broccoli calabrese (sprouting broccoli) and heading broccoli, which is also known as cauliflower broccoli, as its shape resembles the same dense curd shape as cauliflower. Broccoli has been widely known to be a valuable source of carotenoids that have antioxidant properties capable of preventing and reducing risks of cancer and cardiovascular diseases.

Availability: Year-Round from USA

 

Beets

Red beets are made up of both an edible root and edible leaves, 10-12 inch red and green leafy stems ascend from red beet’s ruby red, smooth, bulbous root. Small or medium beets are generally more tender than larger ones. As beets have the highest sugar content of any vegetable, their flavor is typically sweet. The Red beet, Beta vulgaris, is a plant in the Chenopodiaceae family. The color of the Red beetroot is due to a variety of betalain pigments. In the 1800s, George Washington the first president of the United States experimented with cross-pollinating different varieties of beets, chard, and mangels at Mount Vernon.

Availability: Year-Round from USA

 

Cabbage

Green cabbage has tightly enveloped superimposed pale green leaves, with variations of pea-green colorings. They’re thick, broad, deeply veined and waxy in their finish. The flavor of green cabbage is grassy, sweet and cruciferous, a trademark characteristic of cabbage. Green cabbage can reach six to seven inches in diameter and weigh up to 10 pounds.

Availability: Year-Round from USA

 

Cauliflower

Cauliflower is made up of tightly bound clusters of florets that form a dense head, similar to that of broccoli. Resembling a classic tree in shape the clusters sprout from stems that are attached to a singular central white trunk. The stems and trunk are firm and tender and the florets have a dense yet soft and crumbly texture. Its flavor is mild with subtle cruciferous and nutty sweet nuances, a taste that is amplified when roasted. The entire cauliflower, its leaves, trunk, stems, and florets are all edible.

Availability: Year-Round from USA

 

Celery

Celery can grow to optimal heights from 18″ to 24″. It has wide parsley-like green leaves and thick, juicy, ribbed stalks that join at a common base above the root. Celery, at its best, has a juicy and crunchy flesh with a mild salty flavor. Although celery is most often used for its stalks, its leaves are edible as well and have a concentrated celery-flavor.

Availability: Year-Round from USA

 

Romaine Lettuce

Romaine lettuce is medium to large in size with an elongated shape and stiff, upright leaves. The thick heads are loosely connected to a central blanched base and the leaves, averaging 10-15 centimeters in length, are broad with many folds and creases. The outer leaves are dark green with a prominent white central rib, and as the leaves grow smaller in the center, they become paler in color almost fading to white. Romaine lettuce is crisp, succulent, and crunchy with a mild, slightly bitter taste.

Availability: Year-Round from USA

 

Cilantro

Cilantro is also known as Chinese parsley or coriander, and is virtually used in every cuisine around the world. The leaves of cilantro have small serrated edges that extend off a single stem. Cilantro’s flavor can be described as a combination of parsley and citrus-like notes.

Availability: Year-Round from USA&Mexico

 

Carrots

Carrots, depending on the variety, can range in size from small to large and typically average 10-25 centimeters in length. The roots have an elongated, slender shape that can be conical, cylindrical, or slightly irregular depending on growing conditions and the individual cultivar. The skin is smooth, firm, covered in tiny root hairs, and ranges in color from shades of orange, yellow, purple, black, red, to white. Underneath the surface, the flesh generally matches the skin color and is dense, crisp, and slightly aqueous with a snap-like quality. Carrots are crunchy when raw with a sweet or bitter, earthy flavor, and the leaves are also edible with an herbaceous, parsley-like taste.

Availability: Year-Round from USA

 

Asparagus

Asparagus’ deep pistachio-green stalks are tender at the tip and slightly woody and thick towards the end, and a slight purple blush often occurs around the stalk and throughout the conical tip. Standard asparagus’ mildly grassy and sweet flavor matches that of its larger and smaller counterparts. Asparagus contains more glutathione than any other fruit or vegetable. This antioxidant plays an important role in the prevention of certain cancers and diseases, nutrient metabolism and regulating DNA and protein synthesis.

Availability: January through May, October to December from Chile/Peru/USA

 

Artichoke

Globe artichokes range in size from 7 to 13 centimeters in diameter and were traditionally cultivated as a perennial. Each artichoke can weigh up to 3 pounds. Globe artichokes have densely packed leaves that form a compact floret with pistachio and lime green tones throughout. Each leaf contains a needle-like thorn on its tip and is usually cut off during preparation. Globe artichokes can be eaten raw when they are younger and more tender. When cooked, globe artichokes develop flavors of toasted nuts, dry grass, and caramel.

Availability: Year-Round from USA

 

Green Beans

Green beans, also known as French beans. French beans are harvested anywhere from three to four inches in length when their texture and flavor is at its peak. French beans have a thin, cylindrical shape with plump indentations along their contour, outlining the peas inside, which are shelled tightly within the bean flesh. The peas, which are essentially the bean’s seeds, are vibrant lime green in color, semi starchy in texture with a mild taste of the beans sweet and grassy flavors.

Availability: USA & Mexico Year-Round

 

Kale

The standard Kale variety we usually find in the grocery store is a curled green variety. It is hardy and fibrous when fully mature, yet tender enough to be used as a raw salad green when young. The pale green stems are tough and should be removed, while the tightly curled leaves are chewy yet succulent. Kale has an earthy flavor with a nutty sweetness that is accentuated when cooked.

Availability: Year-Round from USA

 

White Dragon Fruit (Pitaya)

Dragon fruit grows on climbing cacti with stems that reach up to 6 meters long. The fruits are oval to oblong in shape, weighing about 8-12 ounces and averaging 10-15 centimeters in length. They have a pink or magenta peel with green scale-like leaves and white flesh that is dotted with tiny edible black seeds, similar to a kiwi. The juicy, spongy yet dense pulp offers a subtly sweet flavor with notes of berry, pear, kiwi, and watermelon, sometimes with just a hint of sourness.

Availability: Year-Round from Vietnam & Ecuador

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
          FL FL FL FL FL FL  

 

Red Dragon Fruit

Red dragon fruits grow on long, thin, vining cactuses that are often seen growing up trees, fences or walls. On the outside, Red dragon fruits look almost identical to the white-fleshed variety. The brightly colored oblong fruits are about 10 centimeters in length and can weigh up to a pound. They have pink to magenta-colored skin that has the appearance of succulent, fleshy scales overlapping, leaving small, green-tipped protrusions along its length. The skin is thin, with an average thickness of only 3 millimeters, so the flesh to rind ratio is high. The bright magenta flesh of the Red dragon fruit is the result of a compound called betacyanin, which is the same pigment present in beets and prickly pear fruit. The pulp has the texture of kiwi fruit, with small, black edible seeds throughout. Red dragon fruit is sweet, though not as sweet as the white-fleshed variety, and has a mild acidity.

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
Vitenam Vietnam Vietnam Vietnam Vietnam Vietnam Vietnam&CA Vietnam&CA Vietnam&CA Vietnam&CA Vietnam&CA Vietnam

 

Yellow Dragon Fruit

YYellow dragon fruit has an oblong shape and is slightly smaller in size than the more common red varieties. The fruits measure approximately 10 centimeters long and 7 centimeters wide. Their size depends on climatic conditions and is often categorized into three different size groups. Their thick yellow skin is covered in small knobby protrusions, which when immature displays small spines that will naturally fall off as the fruit matures. Beneath the skin is a dense white flesh containing numerous petite, edible black seeds. Yellow dragon fruit has a crisp, juicy texture and very sweet, tropical flavor with floral hints and no acidity.
Availability: Year-Round from Thailand&Vietnam

 

Lychee

Lychees are oval-round and petite, roughly the size of a walnut, and their leathery skin is covered with tiny spikes. Young lychee fruits start out green, and as they mature, they become blushed with pink and eventually turn a bright red. The pearly-white pulp is covered in juice and houses a dark-brown seed at its center, which can vary in size from 1/2 inch to 1 inch in length, depending on the variety. The firm yet gelatinous pulp is chewy and juicy with a sweet, fruity flavor, like a cross of strawberry and watermelon with a touch of pineapple-like acidity. Lychees are also fragrant with a tropical scent and a hint of roses.

Availability: May through October from China/Mexico/Israel & Taiwan

 

Longan

Ranging in size from an olive to a small plum and spherical to ovoid in shape, Longans have a thin rough-to-prickly brown easy to remove shell called a pericarp covering its grayish-white translucent pulp. In the center of the juicy flesh is a large smooth jet-black seed with a white ovoid characteristic mark. Having a flesh reminiscent of a peeled grape, the flavor is wonderfully sweet and often described as a mysterious tasting blend of musk, spruce, and gardenia.

Availability: Year-Round from Vietnam

 

Rambutan

Rambutans are closely related to the lychee, the tropical Rambutan, pronounced ram-BYU-tn, varies in type and quality. The fruit may be greenish-yellow, orange or crimson, are oval-shaped and usually 1 – 2 inches long. The soft, flexible exterior shell is covered in stiff, hair-like bristles. While the exterior makes it seem larger than the lychee, the inner fruit is actually smaller. Rambutan flesh is juicy, milky- white, translucent in color, with a grape-like, gelatinous texture surrounding a central seed with an almond-like taste. The flavor of a Rambutan is more acidic than the lychee, sweet and very aromatic.

Availability: Year-Round from Thailand. June through November from China. July through November from Vietnam

Packaging

No content.

Storage & Tips

Broccoli

1. Wrap your broccoli in damp paper towels. Fill a clean, empty spray bottle (one that hasn’t previously been filled with bleach or other caustic cleaning products) with cold water, then gently mist your broccoli’s heads. Loosely wrap the heads with a paper towel so that the towel absorbs some of the moisture. Keep the broccoli in the fridge. It should remain fresh for about three days.

2. Keep your broccoli in a ventilated bag. Simply seal your broccoli in the bag, then poke numerous holes in the bag near the broccoli’s head to ensure good airflow. Keep the broccoli refrigerated. The broccoli should stay fresh for at least a few days with this method. 

Beets

1. Trim the leave and stem before you store in the fridge. Since leaves draw moisture from the root, removing them immediately will help to keep your beets fresh longer. So before storing your beets, you should trim them, leaving about 1 to 2 in (3 to 5 cm) of stem at the top of the root. Don’t trim the tail.

2. Rub the dirt off the roots. Beets grow in the ground, and when they’re harvested they’re covered in dirt. They need to be cleaned, but not by washing, which makes them rot faster. Instead, gently rub the dirt off the root.

3. Place the beets in the crisper drawer. The crisper in the refrigerator is the best place to keep beets fresh, along with your other vegetables. But if they won’t fit in the crisper, a shelf in the fridge will work.

Cabbage

1. Keep your cabbage whole until you plan to use it. When you cut cabbage in half, it begins to lose its vitamin C. If you absolutely must store half of a cabbage, wrap it tightly in plastic wrap and store it in the refrigerator for up to two days.

2. Store the cabbage in the crisper of your fridge. Keeping your cabbage cold will help it retain its nutrients and crisp texture. Place inside a plastic bag first. It should stay in prime condition for up to two weeks.

Cauliflower

Keep cauliflower loosely wrapped in plastic in the fridge. Fresh from the market heads will last up to 2 weeks. You can cut cauliflower into florets and stored them, sealed, in a plastic bag in the fridge. They will last up to a week in a well-regulated refrigerator.

Celery

1. Place the celery in aluminum foil. Many people have aluminum foil in their kitchens. Storing celery in it will keep the celery crisp, even for weeks. Simply wrap the celery in the aluminum foil either cut or intact, and do so tightly. You may want to place the celery on a slightly damp paper towel before you wrap it in the foil. Place the wrapped celery in the refrigerator. The foil will enable a hormone called ethylene to get out. It’s a ripening hormone, meaning its release will keep the celery fresh. You can reuse the foil for several bunches of celery. Plastic bags don’t work as well because the ethylene gas can’t get out, making it more likely the celery will rot. Put the wrapped celery in the typical crisper drawer in your refrigerator.

2. If you do not have aluminum foil, you can use a paper towel. Dampen the paper towel, wrap the celery inside the towel and place it into a Ziplock bag and place it into the fridge.

Romaine Lettuce

1. Remove the core from crisp lettuce heads. Cut out the core with a knife, or pound the stem against a cutting board firmly, then twist the stem to remove the core by hand. Wrap the lettuce in paper towels. Sandwich the head of lettuce — or loose leaves in single layers — between two soft, absorbent paper towels. These will absorb excess water but keep the lettuce in the moist conditions it prefers.

2. Store in a plastic container. This can be a zip-locked bag, hard plastic container, or even a salad spinner. If using a bag, press out some of the air before sealing, without bruising the leaves. If using a hard container, fill it at least halfway with leaves. The more air in the container, the faster you’ll get brown edges.

3. Place in the crisper drawer. This is the coldest part of your fridge, which is ideal for leafy greens. Most grocery store lettuce should last 3-7 days here, depending on freshness, while iceberg may last up to two weeks. Fresh lettuce from your garden or a farm stand may last longer. 

Cilantro

1. Trim the stems. Use a sharp pair of kitchen scissors to trim no more than 1 inch (2.5 cm) of the bottom stem of each sprig of cilantro. By trimming off the bottom of each stem, you are exposing the fresh, “live” portion of the herb still capable of taking in water. After a stem end is exposed to the air for an hour or so, it will die, making the plant’s ability to take in water severely limited.

2. Do not wash the cilantro until you are ready to use it. Fill a jar with water, put the cilantro into the jar and place a clean plastic baggie over the leave and the mouth of the jar, place it into the fridge.

Carrots

1. Remove the greens from your carrot. Greens deplete the carrot of both moisture and nutrients. Use a cutting board and sharp knife to cut the greens from the carrot.

2. Roll up the carrots up in a sheet of bubble wrap. Use the bubble wrap with the small textured bubbles. The bubble wrap will enable the perfect amount of moisture to stay close to the carrots, but the texture of the bubble wrap will prevent that moisture from gathering right on the surface of the carrots. The bubble wrap will add up to two extra weeks of freshness to your carrots. Plastic bags lead to rotting.

3. Place your wrapped carrots in the vegetable drawer of the fridge. It is best to use carrots within one to two weeks, as this will provide you with the best nutrients and taste value.

Asparagus

1. Fill a bag or jar with an inch of water. A glass mason jar is usually just the right size for a bunch of asparagus. An empty jelly jar or pickle jar also works well. If you’re trying to save space in your refrigerator, go with a sturdy plastic storage bag. Fill your storage container with an inch or so of water, enough to submerge the ends of the asparagus.

2. Store the asparagus upright in the container. Storing the asparagus upright allows it to soak up the water from the container, keeping the stalks fresh and firm. If you’re using a storage bag, rubber band the top of the bag around the asparagus so you can store it upright on the refrigerator door without spilling water.

3. Cover with a plastic bag. Use a loose plastic bag (the type used for produce at the grocery store) and drape it over the asparagus tips and jar. This will keep the asparagus tasting fresh; without the bag, the stalks will take on the flavor of whatever else you’re keeping in your refrigerator. 

Artichoke

1. Leave the artichokes unwashed. While it may seem like a good idea to wash your artichokes before storing them, it can actually cause them to spoil faster. That’s because the peel can break down if there’s too much moisture, which can lead to infection.

2. Sprinkle the stems with water. While you don’t want to wash artichokes before you store them, it’s important to ensure that the stems are somewhat moist when you refrigerate them. Sprinkle a few drops of water over the stems to keep them from becoming dehydrated.

3. Place the artichokes in a plastic bag and refrigerate them. Once you’ve sprinkled the artichoke stems with water, set the artichokes inside a perforated plastic bag. Put the bag in the refrigerator — if possible, place them in the coldest part of your fridge, such as the crisper drawer, so they’ll stay fresher longer.

Green Bean

1. Do not wash the beans. Washing the beans can leave moisture on them, which can cause them to mold. Use your hand to wipe off any dirt or debris on the beans, if any.

2. Do not wash the beans. Washing the beans can leave moisture on them, which can cause them to mold. Use your hand to wipe off any dirt or debris on the beans, if any.

3. Put the green beans in the bag. Make sure the green beans sit flat in the bag. Push as much air as you can out of the bag before you seal it. Keep the beans in the vegetable crisper drawer in your refrigerator so they stay fresh. It can last up to 1 week.

Kale

1. Place the kale in an airtight plastic bag. Pack the kale into a resealable plastic bag for easy access, but do not seal the bag yet. If you’re working with a larger batch of kale, place the kale into an airtight plastic container. Keep the leaves relatively loose and don’t pack the container too full since doing so could bruise or otherwise damage the kale.

2. Surround the kale with paper towels then seal the bag tight. Place a clean, dry paper towel into the bag with the kale. Squeeze out as much air from the bag as possible before sealing it. The paper towel should be able to absorb any excess moisture and prevent the kale from spoiling faster.

3. Place the kale in the crisper drawer of your refrigerator and use it within 5 to 7 days. If you don’t have a crisper drawer, keep the kale in the door compartment or on a standard refrigerator shelf with the stems facing toward the back of the refrigerator.

Dragon Fruit (Pitaya)

1. Don’t peel or cut the dragon fruit before storing it. Peeling or cutting a dragon fruit before you store it will shorten its life significantly. Take it straight from your grocery bag to the storage spot to ensure it stays fresh.

2. Leave your dragon fruit on the counter for 2-3 days. If you’re going to be eating the dragon fruit in the next few days, place it on the counter. Dragon fruit will last a couple of days simply sitting out, but make sure you don’t cut into or peel it beforehand.

3. Keep dragon fruit for up to 2 weeks in the refrigerator. Putting dragon fruit into the refrigerator will slow down the ripening process. Be sure to put the dragon fruit in a sealed container or bag first. It should last for 2 weeks or more in the fridge.

4. Place sliced dragon fruit in a sealed container in the refrigerator. If you’ve already cut up your dragon fruit and want to save it, remove the flesh from the peel. Put the dragon fruit into a sealed container or plastic bag. Remove as much air as possible from the bag or container to keep it fresh.

Lychee

1. Fresh lychee, with the skin still intact, should be wrapped in a paper towel, placed in a perforated plastic bag, and stored in the refrigerator until use. 

2. Lychee ferments as they age, so use them quickly and do not let them sit in the fridge for more than one week.

Nutrition

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